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International Relations

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Power and Risk in Foreign Policy: Understanding China’s Crisis Behavior
Kai He discusses China’s foreign policy and responses to crises under former General Secretary Hu Jintao. He argues that when Chinese leaders perceive that their political survival is threatened they are more likely to exhibit risky behavior in terms of foreign policy. He discusses how these findings could inform our understanding of China’s current and future foreign policy orientation.


 

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Did Chirac Say ‘Non’? Revisiting UN Diplomacy on Iraq, 2002-03
Stefano Recchia revisits the George W. Bush administration’s attempt in the spring of 2003 to secure UN approval for the Iraq war. Drawing on new evidence from declassified documents and interviews with senior officials, he argues that the administration would have stood a good chance of securing UN approval—notwithstanding French opposition. But the administration had to be willing to postpone the start of military operations by up to six weeks and endorse a set of demanding benchmarks for Iraqi compliance, as proposed by Britain and several nonpermanent members of the Security Council. 


 

Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Japan’s Nuclear Hedge: Beyond “Allergy” and Breakout
Richard J. Samuels and JAMES L. SCHOFF examine the origins and current state of Japan’s policy toward nuclear weapons. They argue that Japan’s nuclear hedging strategy is likely to continue in the near future, but maybe not indefi nitely. Japan’s choices to go nuclear will be determined by its ability to manage potential threats and on the strength of the U.S. commitment to extended deterrence.


 

Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Saint or Sinner? Human Rights and U.S. Support for the Arms Trade Treaty
JENNIFER L. ERICKSON analyses the U.S. decision to support the UN Arms Trade Treaty initiative in October 2009. She argues that this support was part of a broader policy shift toward multilateralism that the Obama administration made in an effort to repair the reputation of the United States within the diplomatic community.


 

Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Is the American Century Over?
Joseph S. Nye, Jr., discusses whether the “American century” beginning in 1941 has come to the end. He argues that transnational and non-state forces are changing America’s pre-eminence, but that we are not entering a post-American world.


Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Building National Armies after Civil War: Lessons from Bosnia, El Salvador, and Lebanon
Zoltan Barany looks at how national armies are built following the conclusion of civil wars and identifies lessons derived from three cases: Bosnia and Herzegovina, El Salvador, and Lebanon. He describes the key components of successful post-civil war building of an army.


 

Volume 128 - Number 4 - Winter 2013-14

Did Bush Democratize the Middle East? The Effects of External–Internal Linkages
Bruce Gilley examines how the so-called Freedom Agenda of President George W. Bush affected politics in the Middle East. He concludes that this agenda generally exerted positive effects on democratic change in the region, although often working in unintended ways and usually interacting with domestic factors. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 4 - Winter 2013-14

Conceptualizing Containment: The Iranian Threat and the Future of Gulf Security
ZACHARY K. GOLDMAN and MIRA RAPP-HOOPER discuss American security interests in the Persian Gulf region and the prospects for effective cooperation among Gulf states to contain Iran. They find that it is unlikely that the United States will be able to establish a containment regime that relies upon the Gulf Cooperation Council and that informal, bilateral ties to states in the region are a preferable policy recourse. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

After War: Inside the U.S. Civilian Struggle to Build Peace
RENANAH MILES examines recent stabilization and reconstruction missions in Afghanistan and Iraq. She analyzes persistent shortfalls in the ability of the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development to conduct these missions. She contends that organizational culture and bureaucratic turf wars undermine civilian leadership and encourage the military to compensate in its absence. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

What Really Happened in Planning for Postwar Iraq?
Stephen Benedict Dyson challenges the argument that the U.S. government failed to conduct planning for the post-Saddam Iraq. He shows that a plan for governing the country jointly with Iraqi leaders was developed and endorsed by the George W. Bush administration. Yet this plan was not implemented as a result of the on-the-ground decisions of Ambassador L. Paul Bremer, who formalized an occupation and began an extended period of direct rule. 


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Between the Eagle and the Dragon

G. JOHN IKENBERRY argues that East Asia is increasingly marked by the emergence of two hierarchies—a security hierarchy dominated by the United States and an economic hierarchy dominated by China. He argues that in this emerging regional order, the United States will not exercise hegemony as it has in the past. But, paradoxically, it is being drawn into the region in new and more complex ways.

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