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U.S. Politics & Public Policy

 

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Democracy, Elite Bias, and Redistribution in Latin America
VICTOR MENALDO discusses the effects of democracy on redistribution in Latin America. He challenges the view that democratization has been a credible commitment to redistribution in the region. He argues that redistribution is unlikely if authoritarian elites can manipulate the rules of the democratic game.


 

Volume 131 - Number 1 - Spring 2016

The Geographies of Economic Voting in Presidential and Congressional Elections
Jordan M. Ragusa and MATTHEW TARPEY look at whether local economic conditions affect voting behavior in the United States. They argue that economic voting is principally a national phenomenon, with variation in the national unemployment rate having robust effects in both presidential and congressional elections.


 

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Does Strategic Planning Matter? The Outcomes of U.S. National Security Reviews
Jordan Tama examines the outcomes of U.S. strategic reviews in the area of national security. He finds that reviews rarely generate major strategic change without an external shock and direct presidential involvement. But quadrennial reviews by government agencies can still serve as valuable tools for leading and managing complex bureaucracies. 


 

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Language Dominance, Bilingualism, and Latino Political Participation in the United States
Rodolfo O. de la Garza and Alan Yang analyze voting and political participation patterns of the Latino electorate in the United States. They find that Latino bilinguals and the Spanish dominant live in environments that provide them access to more and different information than English dominant Latinos. They argue that this results in their having equal or higher rates of participation and voting. 


 

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Do Facts Matter? Information and Misinformation in American Politics
Jennifer L. Hochschild and KATHERINE LEVINE EINSTEIN explore the impact of citizens’ misinformation on American democratic politics. Examining cases ranging from the invasion of Iraq to refusal to vaccinate children, they find that citizens’ political use of misinformation is harmful and even dangerous. The misinformed are particularly difficult to persuade and a subset of politicians have powerful incentives to keep them that way. Political misinformation, thus, provides a challenge to political and policy choices.


 

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Vested Interests and Political Institutions
TERRY M. MOE maintains that vested interests need to be brought to the center of the theory of political institutions. He sets out some basic theoretical building blocks that bear on their behavior, power, and institutional consequences. He then applies these general arguments to the case of American education reform.


 

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Papers Please: State-Level Anti-Immigrant Legislation in the Wake of Arizona’s SB 1070
SOPHIA J. WALLACE examines the factors that influence the introduction of SB 1070–type bills in state legislatures. She finds that Republican control of state legislatures and a rising unemployment rate greatly increase the likelihood of introducing this type of restrictive immigration bill. She asserts that Latino population changes and the percentage of Latino state legislators do not have an impact.


 

Volume 128 - Number 4 - Winter 2013-14

Philosophical Pragmatism and the Constitutional Watershed of 1912
TRYGVE THRONTVEIT argues that intellectuals and activists indebted to the pragmatist tradition of American philosophy decisively shaped the debate between Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson during the election of 1912. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

Death and Taxes: Issue Framing and Conservative Coalition Maintenance
RICHARD MEAGHER describes how and why the estate tax became part of the pro-family agenda of social conservatives. He explores the role of estate tax repeal in maintaining the alliance between economic and social conservatives within the Republican Party. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 2 - Summer 2013

Cabinet Duration in Presidential Democracies
JAE HYEOK SHIN analyzes cabinet duration in ten presidential democracies in Latin America. He finds that cabinet attributes greatly affect cabinet durability and that the performance of the cabinet has larger effects on its stability than do its handling of exogenous crises. 


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Disruption, Demonization, Deliverance, and Norm Destruction: The Rhetorical Signature of Donald J. Trump

KATHLEEN HALL JAMIESON and DORON TAUSSIG examine Donald Trump’s rhetoric during the presidential campaign and through his first 100 days in office. They argue that Trump’s “rhetorical signature,” which distinguishes him from his predecessors, certified Trump’s authenticity as a candidate of change and now complicate his ability to govern.

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