Share this
PREVIOUS ARTICLE ALL CONTENTS Next ARTICLE

When Do the Rich Win?
J. ALEXANDER BRANHAM, STUART N. SOROKA, and Christopher Wlezien examine the influence of economic “haves” and “have-nots” on public policy decisions in the United States. They find that the middle class, the rich, and the poor almost always agree on policies. When they disagree, the rich win only slightly more often. They conclude that the rich may matter more than they seemingly should but they do not dominate policymaking.

More by This Author

The Government-Citizen Disconnect, Suzanne Mettler Reviewed by Christopher Wlezien

American Public Opinion, Advocacy, and Policy in Congress: What the Public Wants and What It Gets, Paul Burstein Reviewed by Christopher Wlezien

Why Budgets Matter: Budget Policy and American Politics, Dennis S. Ippolito Reviewed by Christopher Wlezien

Abortion Rates in the United States: The Influence of Opinion and Policy, Matthew E. Wetstein Reviewed by Christopher Wlezien

About PSQ's Editor

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

CONFERENCES & EVENTS

WEBINAR BOOK TALK
Downfall: The Demise of a President and His Party
June 25, 2020
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT VIEW ALL EVENTS

Editor’s spotlight

Race and Public Policy

Social Policy and the Welfare of Black Americans: From Rights to Resources
Charles V. Hamilton

Getting into the Black: Race, Wealth, and Public Policy
Dalton Conley

MORE ABOUT THIS TOPIC

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues

Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book

Presidential Selection and Democracy   PRESIDENTIAL SELECTION AND DEMOCRACY

About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected

newsstand locator
About APS