Volume 129 - Number 3 - War on ISIS

Obama’s War on ISIS: But What Does This Mean?
Robert Jervis discusses President Barack Obama’s decision to go to war against ISIS. He argues that domestic politics and “perhaps common sense” argue against inaction on the part of the United States. He questions, however, the likelihood that Obama’s policy will succeed.

pp. 1-5

The War Powers Resolution and the Constitution
Jacob K. Javits, the former U.S. Senator and the principal author of the War Powers Resolution of 1973, urges Congress to uphold its Constitutional authority to partake in the decision-making process to commit U.S. troops to war. Originally written in 1984, the article remains relevant and speaks to the current political landscape pertaining to the role of the President and of Congress in the war against ISIS.

pp. 6-9

Tactical Advantages of Terror
Richard K. Betts applies offense-defense theory to explain the intense advantages that terrorist groups have in launching offensive strikes and in exploiting the defenses that a nation can put up in this era of globalization and asymmetric warfare.

pp. 19-35

Volume 130 - Number 1 - Spring 2015

How Ideology Divides American Liberals and Conservatives over Israel
Peter Hays Gries examines the impact of ideology on the American public’s attitudes towards Israel. He finds that social and cultural conservatives feel much more warmly towards Israel—and coolly towards Palestinians and Muslims—than their liberal counterparts. 

pp. 51-78

Party Pursuits and the Presidential–House Electoral Connection, 1900–2008, Jeffrey M. Stonecash
Reviewed by DANIEL M. SHEA

pp. 134-136

Leaders in Conflict: Bush and Rumsfeld in Iraq, Stephen Benedict Dyson
Reviewed by Paul R. Pillar

pp. 136-137

Fighting for Peace: Veterans and Military Families in the Anti-Iraq War Movement, Lisa Leitz
Reviewed by FABIO ROJAS

pp. 161-163

Volume 129 - Number 4 - Winter 2014-15

Report X Marks the Spot: The British Government’s Deceptive Dossier on Iraq and WMD
Eric Herring and PIERS ROBINSON evaluate the British government’s claims for war against Iraq through a critical evaluation of the Iraq Dossier, which was published in September 2002. They argue that government officials, through intentional distortion and exaggeration of intelligence, pursued a campaign of deceptive organized political persuasion. 

pp. 551-583

Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, John Paul Stevens
Reviewed by Geoffrey R. Stone

pp. 711-712

Financing Medicaid: Federalism and the Growth of America’s Health Care Safety Net, Shanna Rose
Reviewed by Frank J. Thompson

pp. 714-715

Subsidizing Democracy: How Public Funding Changes Elections and How It Can Work in the Future, Michael G. Miller
Reviewed by Brian E. Adams

pp. 733-735

Malcolm X at Oxford Union: Racial Politics in a Global Era, Saladin Ambar
Reviewed by FELIX GERMAIN

pp. 736-738

The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper: Civil–Military Relations and the United Nations, Arturo C. Sotomayor
Reviewed by CRAIG ARCENEAUX

pp. 748-749

Making Constitutions: Presidents, Parties and Institutional Choice in Latin America, Gabriel L. Negretto
Reviewed by TOM GINSBURG

pp. 749-751

No Use: Nuclear Weapons and U.S. National Security, Thomas M. Nichols
Reviewed by TODD S. SECHSER

pp. 754-756

Volume 129 - Number 3 - Fall 2014

Candidate Emergence Revisited: The Lingering Effects of Recruitment, Ambition, and Successful Prospects among House Candidates
L. Sandy Maisel and WALTER STONE identify the sources of political ambition of potential congressional candidates. They find that potential candidates are influenced by their perceived prospects for success, by their ambition for a congressional career, and by the costs associated with running for congress. 

pp. 429-447

Secrets and Leaks: The Dilemma of State Secrecy, Rahul Sagar
Reviewed by Geoffrey R. Stone

pp. 501-502

Take Up Your Pen: Unilateral Presidential Directives in American Politics, Graham G. Dodds
Reviewed by WILLIAM P. MARSHALL

pp. 502-503

The End of Exceptionalism in American Education: The Changing Politics of School Reform, Jeffrey R. Henig
Reviewed by Terry M. Moe

pp. 509-512

Changing Minds or Changing Channels? Partisan News in an Age of Choice, Martin Johnson
Reviewed by Robert Y. Shapiro

pp. 513-515

Blinking Red: Crisis and Compromise in American Intelligence after 9/11, Michael Allen
Reviewed by Glenn Hastedt

pp. 533-534

Transforming India: Challenges to the World’s Largest Democracy, Sumantra Bose
Reviewed by WALTER ANDERSEN

pp. 539-541

Competing Motives in the Partisan Mind: How Loyalty and Responsiveness Shape Party Identification and Democracy, Eric W. Groenendyk
Reviewed by CHRISTOPHER D. JOHNSTON

pp. 547-548

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Building National Armies after Civil War: Lessons from Bosnia, El Salvador, and Lebanon
Zoltan Barany looks at how national armies are built following the conclusion of civil wars and identifies lessons derived from three cases: Bosnia and Herzegovina, El Salvador, and Lebanon. He describes the key components of successful post-civil war building of an army.

pp. 211-238

An Education in Politics: The Origin and Evolution of No Child Left Behind, Jesse H. Rhodes
Reviewed by Terry M. Moe

pp. 333-336

He Runs, She Runs: Why Gender Stereotypes Do Not Harm Women Candidates, Deborah Jordan Brooks
Reviewed by JESSICA ROBINSON PREECE

pp. 340-342

Afghanistan from the Cold War through the War on Terror, Barnett R. Rubin
Reviewed by PAUL D. MILLER

pp. 342-343

Development Aid Confronts Politics: The Almost Revolution, Thomas Carothers
Reviewed by Carol Lancaster

pp. 374-375
Page 1    OF 17 >

About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

From the Archives

U.S.-China Relations

The China Card: Playing Politics with Sino-American Relations Peter Trubowitz and Jungkun Seo examine how and when China emerged as a “hot button” issue in American politics. They show that the politicization of Sino-American relations has had as much to do with geopolitical considerations as well as electoral strategizing in the United States.

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues

ONLINE SYMPOSIUM

Candidate Selection Process

With the 2014 Congressional elections approaching, the Academy of Political Science and Political Science Quarterly present an online symposium focused on the candidate selection process. The scope of the articles included in the symposium is threefold: review the reasons why candidate recruiting is so critical to the success of political parties; evaluate how candidates assess personal and political choices and the way in which ambition endures over time; and, examine how the changing campaign finance landscape affects the resources available to those who consider running for political office.

Symposium Organizers: Paul S. Herrnson and Kelly D. Patterson

VIEW THE ARTICLES

Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book

CHINA'S GREAT LEAP OUTWARD: Hard and Soft Dimensions of a Rising Power   CHINA'S GREAT LEAP OUTWARD: HARD AND SOFT DIMENSIONS OF A RISING POWER

About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected
newsstand locator
About APS