regions

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Ignorant Mobs or Rational Actors? Understanding Support for Venezuela’s “Bolivarian Revolution”
PASCAL LUPIEN addresses the presumption of irrationality of the poor and the resurgence of populism in Latin America. He considers the perspectives of supporters of the late Hugo Chávez and his “Bolivarian Revolution.” He finds that their support is based on concrete, tangible benefits and that they view political developments with a more critical eye than they are generally given credit for.

U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Understanding International Partnership: The Complicated Rapprochement between the United States and Brazil
Javier Corrales studies the rapprochement between the United States and Brazil in an effort to develop a theory about international partnerships. He contends that power transitions can offer new incentives for cooperation so long as the existing power faces greater security threats in other regions of the world and the rising power meets certain tests of reliability.

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Generals and Autocrats: How Coup-Proofing Predetermined the Military Elite’s Behavior in the Arab Spring
HICHAM BOU NASSIF analyzes the behavior of the military elite in Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia during the Arab Spring. He argues that the different reactions of the military elite to the call of autocrats for support remains one of the fundamental puzzles of the Arab Spring. He identifies the factors that determined whether the military elite had a vested interest in the status quo and the capacity to defend it.

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Finding Bin Laden: Lessons for a New American Way of Intelligence
ERIK J. DAHL describes the nearly decade-long search for Osama bin Laden and what it reveals about the capabilities and the limitations of the American intelligence community. He argues that this case suggests that we may be seeing the first signs of a “new American way of intelligence” with a reduced reliance on the expensive, high-technology systems of the Cold War and a greater emphasis on broad-based intelligence fusion and analysis.

U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Vested Interests and Political Institutions
TERRY M. MOE maintains that vested interests need to be brought to the center of the theory of political institutions. He sets out some basic theoretical building blocks that bear on their behavior, power, and institutional consequences. He then applies these general arguments to the case of American education reform.

International Relations

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Building National Armies after Civil War: Lessons from Bosnia, El Salvador, and Lebanon
Zoltan Barany looks at how national armies are built following the conclusion of civil wars and identifies lessons derived from three cases: Bosnia and Herzegovina, El Salvador, and Lebanon. He describes the key components of successful post-civil war building of an army.

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Papers Please: State-Level Anti-Immigrant Legislation in the Wake of Arizona’s SB 1070
SOPHIA J. WALLACE examines the factors that influence the introduction of SB 1070–type bills in state legislatures. She finds that Republican control of state legislatures and a rising unemployment rate greatly increase the likelihood of introducing this type of restrictive immigration bill. She asserts that Latino population changes and the percentage of Latino state legislators do not have an impact.

Volume 128 - Number 4 - Winter 2013-14

Did Bush Democratize the Middle East? The Effects of External–Internal Linkages
Bruce Gilley examines how the so-called Freedom Agenda of President George W. Bush affected politics in the Middle East. He concludes that this agenda generally exerted positive effects on democratic change in the region, although often working in unintended ways and usually interacting with domestic factors. 

Law & Institutions

Volume 127 - Number 4 - Winter 2012-2013

Suspension of Law during Crisis
ROSS J. CORBETT analyzes the claim that the response to some emergencies requires a departure from the law. He notes that this claim rests on a particular view of what the law is and is best understood as an argument that emergencies ought to be handled extra-legally. He argues that interrogating this extra-legalist claim reveals another strategy for controlling executive discretion while permitting enough flexibility to preserve the public good. 

Politics & Society

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Vested Interests and Political Institutions
TERRY M. MOE maintains that vested interests need to be brought to the center of the theory of political institutions. He sets out some basic theoretical building blocks that bear on their behavior, power, and institutional consequences. He then applies these general arguments to the case of American education reform.

Volume 127 - Number 2 - Summer 2012

The Demise of the PLO: Neither Diaspora nor Statehood
Hillel Frisch analyzes the demise of the Palestinian Liberation Organization and the withering of the Palestinian diaspora. Unfortunately for the Palestinians, the presumed virtues of globalization in facilitating diaspora are hardly a substitute for a mobilized homeland state, which seems unattainable.

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

The Role of Political Science in China: Intellectuals and Authoritarian Resilience
STEPHEN NOAKES discusses the relationship between political scientists and the state in China. He argues that political scientists do more to strengthen the rule of the Chinese Communist Party than they do to undermine it, and are therefore complicit in preserving the authoritarian status quo.

About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

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European Union

A Democratic Dilemma: System Effectiveness versus Citizen Participation Robert A. Dahl argues that the Maastricht Treaty presented Europeans with a fundamental democratic dilemma: choosing between their political effectiveness as citizens within their countries and the effectiveness of the European Union as a transnational system.

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ONLINE SYMPOSIUM

Candidate Selection Process

The Academy of Political Science and Political Science Quarterly present an online symposium focused on the candidate selection process. The scope of the articles included in the symposium is threefold: review the reasons why candidate recruiting is so critical to the success of political parties; evaluate how candidates assess personal and political choices and the way in which ambition endures over time; and, examine how the changing campaign finance landscape affects the resources available to those who consider running for political office.

Symposium Organizers: Paul S. Herrnson and Kelly D. Patterson

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The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

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With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

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