regions

Volume 132 - Number 4 - Winter 2017–18

The Case of the Pivot to Asia: System Effects and the Origins of Strategy
NICHOLAS D. ANDERSON and Victor D. Cha discuss the origins of the pivot to Asia, the Obama administration’s strategy in the Asia-Pacific. They argue that the pivot was neither a failure, as its critics suggest, nor a success, as its supporters claim. For the authors the pivot was a midcourse adjustment to a weak and flawed early Obama Asia policy.

Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

Chinese Thinking on the South China Sea and the Future of Regional Security
FENG ZHANG finds that the ongoing debates among diverse Chinese actors and interest groups, suggest that China has not developed a distinct or coherent strategy toward the South China Sea. He argues that the future of Chinese policy remains dependent upon the outcome of this debate and the interactions between China and other countries involved in the region.

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U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Unequal Partners: U.S. Collaboration with China and India in Research and Development
ANDREW B. KENNEDY argues that the globalization of research and development has generated an interdependence among the United States, China, and India, but such that generally favors Washington. Nonetheless, several constraints make it difficult for the U.S. government to exploit this potential.

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Intelligence and the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars
Richard H. Immerman assesses the efforts of the U.S. intelligence community in Iraq and Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. He argues that policymakers are primarily culpable for the missteps in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and that intelligence played a larger role in efforts to terminate the wars than in decisions to engage in them.

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U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume 132 - Number 4 - Winter 2017–18

Down with the Southern Cross: Opinions on the Confederate Battle Flag in South Carolina
SCOTT H. HUFFMON, H. GIBBS KNOTTS, and SETH C. MCKEE analyze the significant shift in public opinion among South Carolinians toward the Confederate battle flag, after the shooting in a Charleston, South Carolina, church in the summer of 2015. They argue that the shooting served as the catalyst that galvanized public opinion to support the removal of the flag flying on a Confederate memorial.

Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

The Racial Gap in Wait Times: Why Minority Precincts Are Underserved by Local Election Officials
STEPHEN PETTIGREW demonstrates that voters in mostly minority electoral precincts wait considerably longer than those in predominantly white precincts. He finds that a considerable amount of this racial gap can be attributed to logistical decisions made by local election officials.

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International Relations

Volume 132 - Number 4 - Winter 2017–18

The Enduring Appeal and Danger of World Order Making by the U.S.: A Review Essay
Ronald R. Krebs reviews Richard Haass’ new book, A World in Disarray, which makes the case for U.S. leadership in constructing a new legitimate world order. He argues that Haass’ vision is driven by nostalgia for a world that never existed and that it warrants caution: world-shaping ambitions have proven extremely costly.

Volume 132 - Number 4 - Winter 2017–18

The U.S. Nuclear Umbrella over South Korea: Nuclear Weapons and Extended Deterrence
TERENCE ROEHRIG argues that military, strategic, and moral considerations make it unlikely that the United States would use nuclear weapons to defend South Korea. He claims that the U.S. nuclear umbrella has served as a political tool used to demonstrate the U.S. commitment to South Korea.

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Law & Institutions

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

The Roberts Court and Democracy: A Review Essay on Judicial Review and Liberal Critique
ERIC SEGALL reviews Stephen Gottlieb’s recently published book Unfit for Democracy: The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics. He agrees with Gottlieb’s argument that the Roberts Court has too often neglected the needs of racial minorities, the poor, and the disenfranchised. Segall suggests that Gottlieb could have made a more persuasive case by setting forth in more detail the conservative positions supporting the Roberts Court decisions.

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Military Aid and Human Rights: Assessing the Impact of U.S. Security Assistance Programs
MARIYA OMELICHEVA, BRITTNEE CARTER, and LUKE B. CAMPBELL assess the relationship between U.S. security assistance programs and the degree to which foreign militaries respect civilian human rights in times of political instability. They conclude that these programs do not have a uniform impact on human rights practices in the states that receive U.S. military aid. Rather, the relationship is contingent upon various factors, primarily whether security assistance programs include an educational and training component.

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Politics & Society

Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

“Whither We Are Tending”: Interrogating the Retrenchment Narrative in U.S. Environmental Policy
DAVID J. SOUSA and Christopher McGrory Klyza argue that environmental policy moves in the direction favored by environmentalists due to the strong statutes that constitute the policy landscape. They find that this runs counter to the retrenchment narrative, which argues the opposite.

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?
DOV WAXMAN analyzes the role played by American Jews and American Jewish pro-Israel organizations in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. He challenges the popular notion that the pro-Israel lobby powerfully influences U.S. policy pertaining to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

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About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

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Editor’s spotlight

Developments in Beijing

The Varieties of Collective Financial Statecraft: The BRICS and China
LESLIE ELLIOTT ARMIJO

Chinese Thinking on the South China Sea and the Future of Regional Security
FENG ZHANG

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Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

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With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

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