regions

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

China Engages the World, Warily: A Review Essay
Andrew Scobell reviews John W. Garver’s history of China’s foreign relations since 1949. He finds China’s Quest to be an insightful and illuminating guide to the foreign policy of the People’s Republic of China.

U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Unequal Partners: U.S. Collaboration with China and India in Research and Development
ANDREW B. KENNEDY argues that the globalization of research and development has generated an interdependence among the United States, China, and India, but such that generally favors Washington. Nonetheless, several constraints make it difficult for the U.S. government to exploit this potential.

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Israeli Perceptions of the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Gil Merom analyzes the multiple levels of what he characterizes as an Israeli “alarmist” perception of the Iranian nuclear threat. He argues that Iran’s nuclear military program would be less of a threat than argued by the Netanyahu government and that it would not merit an Israeli strategic change, be it formally exposing Israel’s nuclear capabilities or striking Iran preventively. 

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Intelligence and the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars
Richard H. Immerman assesses the efforts of the U.S. intelligence community in Iraq and Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. He argues that policymakers are primarily culpable for the missteps in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and that intelligence played a larger role in efforts to terminate the wars than in decisions to engage in them.

U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

The Mediating Effect of Authoritarianism on Immigrant Access to TANF: A State-Level Analysis
JASON E. KEHRBERG discusses the effects of authoritarianism in American states and specifically on immigrant access to TANF. He uses an original measure of authoritarianism and concludes that states with authoritarian populations are more likely to deny immigrants access to welfare benefits.

International Relations

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

From De-Nazification of Germany to De-Baathification of Iraq
AYSEGUL KESKIN ZEREN compares and contrasts the design and implementation processes undertaken by the United States during the de-Nazifcation of Germany and the de-Baathifcation of Iraq. She discusses the historical, political, cultural, and economic differences between Germany and Iraq and those between the Nazi and Baath regimes. She argues that de-Nazifcation was an inaccurate analogy for de-Baathifcation.

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

Debating War Powers: Battles in the Clinton and Obama Administrations
SARAH BURNS challenges the concept that presidential overreach has eroded the separation of powers in the realm of warfare. She argues that rather than causing the erosion, presidents have responded to Congress’s reluctance to deliberate about military affairs. They have relied increasingly on questionable legal justifications from executive branch lawyers.

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

The President’s Daily Brief: Managing the Relationship between Intelligence and the Policymaker
ADRIAN WOLFBERG examines the roles of intelligence officers who present the President’s Daily Brief to the nation’s most senior policymakers. He argues that these officers add to the political landscape by contextualizing meta-information, that is, information about information, that only they can acquire and convey. He concludes that PDB briefers operate as a parallel organization to the intelligence community.

Law & Institutions

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

The Roberts Court and Democracy: A Review Essay on Judicial Review and Liberal Critique
ERIC SEGALL reviews Stephen Gottlieb’s recently published book Unfit for Democracy: The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics. He agrees with Gottlieb’s argument that the Roberts Court has too often neglected the needs of racial minorities, the poor, and the disenfranchised. Segall suggests that Gottlieb could have made a more persuasive case by setting forth in more detail the conservative positions supporting the Roberts Court decisions.

Politics & Society

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?
DOV WAXMAN analyzes the role played by American Jews and American Jewish pro-Israel organizations in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. He challenges the popular notion that the pro-Israel lobby powerfully influences U.S. policy pertaining to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Military Aid and Human Rights: Assessing the Impact of U.S. Security Assistance Programs
MARIYA OMELICHEVA, BRITTNEE CARTER, and LUKE B. CAMPBELL assess the relationship between U.S. security assistance programs and the degree to which foreign militaries respect civilian human rights in times of political instability. They conclude that these programs do not have a uniform impact on human rights practices in the states that receive U.S. military aid. Rather, the relationship is contingent upon various factors, primarily whether security assistance programs include an educational and training component.

Volume 131 - Number 4 - Winter 2016–17

Conflict and Compromise in American Religious Politics: A Review Essay
DAVID O’CONNELL reviews two new books on religion’s role in American politics, Mark A. Smith’s Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics and Neil J. Young’s We Gather Together: The Religious Right and the Problem of Interfaith Politics. He argues that these works of scholarship show us how people of different religious and moral beliefs are not as politically divided as one might think.

About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

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From the Archives

LONDON TERRORIST ATTACK

Tactical Advantages of Terror

RICHARD BETTS applies offense-defense theory to explain the intense advantages that terrorist groups have in launching offensive strikes and in exploiting the defenses that a nation can put up in this era of globalization and asymmetric warfare.

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Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

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The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

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With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

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