regions

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Israeli Perceptions of the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Gil Merom analyzes the multiple levels of what he characterizes as an Israeli “alarmist” perception of the Iranian nuclear threat. He argues that Iran’s nuclear military program would be less of a threat than argued by the Netanyahu government and that it would not merit an Israeli strategic change, be it formally exposing Israel’s nuclear capabilities or striking Iran preventively. 

U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Unequal Partners: U.S. Collaboration with China and India in Research and Development
ANDREW B. KENNEDY argues that the globalization of research and development has generated an interdependence among the United States, China, and India, but such that generally favors Washington. Nonetheless, several constraints make it difficult for the U.S. government to exploit this potential.

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

The Steady Leadership of George H.W. Bush: A Review Essay of Destiny and Power
Meena Bose reviews Jon Meacham’s biography Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush. She finds that Bush’s diplomatic expertise and collegial leadership style raise important questions about the role of the presidency in the American political system.

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Intelligence and the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars
Richard H. Immerman assesses the efforts of the U.S. intelligence community in Iraq and Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. He argues that policymakers are primarily culpable for the missteps in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and that intelligence played a larger role in efforts to terminate the wars than in decisions to engage in them.

U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

When Do the Rich Win?
J. ALEXANDER BRANHAM, STUART N. SOROKA, and Christopher Wlezien examine the influence of economic “haves” and “have-nots” on public policy decisions in the United States. They and that the middle class, the rich, and the poor almost always agree on policies. When they disagree, the rich win only slightly more often. They conclude that the rich may matter more than they seemingly should but they do not dominate policymaking.

International Relations

Volume 131 - Number 4 - Winter 2016–17

Why Presidents Sometimes Do Not Use Intelligence Information
Patrick S. Roberts and Robert P. Saldin identify reasons why presidents sometimes do not use intelligence information. They argue that presidents may opt for “opacity” so as not to act on intelligence information that could upset the global strategic balance or their foreign policy interests. They discuss this phenomenon using as a case study the alleged Israeli-South African nuclear test in 1979.

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

The Triumph of Polarized Partisanship in 2016: Donald Trump’s Improbable Victory
Gary C. Jacobson discusses the reasons Donald Trump’s victory was so improbable, considers why he won anyway, and speculates about what this portends for national politics going forward. He also analyzes the 2016 congressional elections. He finds them, by comparison, uneventful, but with results that confirm the thoroughly partisan, president-centered, and polarized nature of contemporary American electoral politics.

Volume 131 - Number 4 - Winter 2016–17

American Good Fortune and Misperception about the Outside World
Paul R. Pillar assesses how Americans’ unusually favorable circumstances and experiences shape their perceptions of the rest of the world. He argues that as a result of these experiences, American have difficulty understanding the security and economic challenges facing other nations and overestimate how well those nations can create stable democracies.

Law & Institutions

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

The Roberts Court and Democracy: A Review Essay on Judicial Review and Liberal Critique
ERIC SEGALL reviews Stephen Gottlieb’s recently published book Unfit for Democracy: The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics. He agrees with Gottlieb’s argument that the Roberts Court has too often neglected the needs of racial minorities, the poor, and the disenfranchised. Segall suggests that Gottlieb could have made a more persuasive case by setting forth in more detail the conservative positions supporting the Roberts Court decisions.

Politics & Society

Volume 131 - Number 4 - Winter 2016–17

Conflict and Compromise in American Religious Politics: A Review Essay
DAVID O’CONNELL reviews two new books on religion’s role in American politics, Mark A. Smith’s Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics and Neil J. Young’s We Gather Together: The Religious Right and the Problem of Interfaith Politics. He argues that these works of scholarship show us how people of different religious and moral beliefs are not as politically divided as one might think.

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Military Aid and Human Rights: Assessing the Impact of U.S. Security Assistance Programs
MARIYA OMELICHEVA, BRITTNEE CARTER, and LUKE B. CAMPBELL assess the relationship between U.S. security assistance programs and the degree to which foreign militaries respect civilian human rights in times of political instability. They conclude that these programs do not have a uniform impact on human rights practices in the states that receive U.S. military aid. Rather, the relationship is contingent upon various factors, primarily whether security assistance programs include an educational and training component.

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Language Dominance, Bilingualism, and Latino Political Participation in the United States
Rodolfo O. de la Garza and Alan Yang analyze voting and political participation patterns of the Latino electorate in the United States. They find that Latino bilinguals and the Spanish dominant live in environments that provide them access to more and different information than English dominant Latinos. They argue that this results in their having equal or higher rates of participation and voting. 

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Demetrios James Caraley

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LONDON TERRORIST ATTACK

Tactical Advantages of Terror

RICHARD BETTS applies offense-defense theory to explain the intense advantages that terrorist groups have in launching offensive strikes and in exploiting the defenses that a nation can put up in this era of globalization and asymmetric warfare.

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Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

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The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

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With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

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