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Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

From Periphery to the Moderates: Israeli Identity and Foreign Policy in the Middle East
YANIV VOLLER argues that historical experiences, religion, nationalism, and liberalism have molded an Israeli identity and self-perception. He claims that foreign policy doctrines adopted by Israeli policymakers have been shaped less by specific threats and more by Israel’s sense of isolation and location on the periphery of the Middle East.


Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Japan’s Nuclear Hedge: Beyond “Allergy” and Breakout
Richard J. Samuels and JAMES L. SCHOFF examine the origins and current state of Japan’s policy toward nuclear weapons. They argue that Japan’s nuclear hedging strategy is likely to continue in the near future, but maybe not indefi nitely. Japan’s choices to go nuclear will be determined by its ability to manage potential threats and on the strength of the U.S. commitment to extended deterrence.


Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Ignorant Mobs or Rational Actors? Understanding Support for Venezuela’s “Bolivarian Revolution”
PASCAL LUPIEN addresses the presumption of irrationality of the poor and the resurgence of populism in Latin America. He considers the perspectives of supporters of the late Hugo Chávez and his “Bolivarian Revolution.” He finds that their support is based on concrete, tangible benefits and that they view political developments with a more critical eye than they are generally given credit for.


Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Generals and Autocrats: How Coup-Proofing Predetermined the Military Elite’s Behavior in the Arab Spring
HICHAM BOU NASSIF analyzes the behavior of the military elite in Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia during the Arab Spring. He argues that the different reactions of the military elite to the call of autocrats for support remains one of the fundamental puzzles of the Arab Spring. He identifies the factors that determined whether the military elite had a vested interest in the status quo and the capacity to defend it.

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Understanding International Partnership: The Complicated Rapprochement between the United States and Brazil
Javier Corrales studies the rapprochement between the United States and Brazil in an effort to develop a theory about international partnerships. He contends that power transitions can offer new incentives for cooperation so long as the existing power faces greater security threats in other regions of the world and the rising power meets certain tests of reliability.


Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

The German Rescue of the Eurozone: How Germany Is Getting the Europe It Always Wanted
David Art examines Germany’s role in managing the Eurozone crisis. He finds that Chancellor Angela Merkel has used the crisis to reassert long-standing German preferences on fiscal and monetary policy. He argues that the German rescue of the Eurozone has thus come on German terms and constitutes a major institutional redesign of the European Union.


Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Critical Junctures, Catalysts, and Democratic Consolidation in Turkey
RAMAZAN KILINÇ argues that at critical junctures, structural factors weaken and actors are enabled to gain strength for future political trajectories. He applies this argument to democratic consolidation in Turkey. He finds that the 1997 military intervention unintentionally led to the eventual outcome of democratic consolidation. In the absence of this catalyst, it might have taken several more years for structural factors to generate democratization.


Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

The Role of Political Science in China: Intellectuals and Authoritarian Resilience
STEPHEN NOAKES discusses the relationship between political scientists and the state in China. He argues that political scientists do more to strengthen the rule of the Chinese Communist Party than they do to undermine it, and are therefore complicit in preserving the authoritarian status quo.


Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Finding Bin Laden: Lessons for a New American Way of Intelligence
ERIK J. DAHL describes the nearly decade-long search for Osama bin Laden and what it reveals about the capabilities and the limitations of the American intelligence community. He argues that this case suggests that we may be seeing the first signs of a “new American way of intelligence” with a reduced reliance on the expensive, high-technology systems of the Cold War and a greater emphasis on broad-based intelligence fusion and analysis.


Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

After War: Inside the U.S. Civilian Struggle to Build Peace
RENANAH MILES examines recent stabilization and reconstruction missions in Afghanistan and Iraq. She analyzes persistent shortfalls in the ability of the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development to conduct these missions. She contends that organizational culture and bureaucratic turf wars undermine civilian leadership and encourage the military to compensate in its absence. 

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Coming in Spring 2016

Between the Eagle and the Dragon

G. JOHN IKENBERRY argues that East Asia is increasingly marked by the emergence of two hierarchies—a security hierarchy dominated by the United States and an economic hierarchy dominated by China. He argues that in this emerging regional order, the United States will not exercise hegemony as it has in the past. But, paradoxically, it is being drawn into the region in new and more complex ways.


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