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Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

Chinese Thinking on the South China Sea and the Future of Regional Security
FENG ZHANG finds that the ongoing debates among diverse Chinese actors and interest groups, suggest that China has not developed a distinct or coherent strategy toward the South China Sea. He argues that the future of Chinese policy remains dependent upon the outcome of this debate and the interactions between China and other countries involved in the region.


 

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

China Engages the World, Warily: A Review Essay
Andrew Scobell reviews John W. Garver’s history of China’s foreign relations since 1949. He finds China’s Quest to be an insightful and illuminating guide to the foreign policy of the People’s Republic of China.


 

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Israeli Perceptions of the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Gil Merom analyzes the multiple levels of what he characterizes as an Israeli “alarmist” perception of the Iranian nuclear threat. He argues that Iran’s nuclear military program would be less of a threat than argued by the Netanyahu government and that it would not merit an Israeli strategic change, be it formally exposing Israel’s nuclear capabilities or striking Iran preventively. 


 

Volume 131 - Number 4 - Winter 2016–17

The Future of Transboundary Water Conflicts
Miroslav Nincic and MATTHEW WEISS argue that con?ict over access to fresh water could threaten the future of international security. They examine conditions under which such con?ict may arise in the Middle East and South Asia. The authors identify countries most at risk for water-related con?ict and propose policy recommendations to mitigate for these risks.


 

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

The Impact of Voter Fraud Claims on Voter Registration Reform Legislation
MARGARET GROARKE examines the impact that claims of voter fraud has had on three cases of voter registration reforms in the United States. She argues that the opposition that these legislative efforts faced is best understood as a partisan strategy to redistribute the electorate.


 

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Democracy, Elite Bias, and Redistribution in Latin America
VICTOR MENALDO discusses the effects of democracy on redistribution in Latin America. He challenges the view that democratization has been a credible commitment to redistribution in the region. He argues that redistribution is unlikely if authoritarian elites can manipulate the rules of the democratic game.


 

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Intelligence and the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars
Richard H. Immerman assesses the efforts of the U.S. intelligence community in Iraq and Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. He argues that policymakers are primarily culpable for the missteps in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and that intelligence played a larger role in efforts to terminate the wars than in decisions to engage in them.


 

Volume 131 - Number 1 - Spring 2016

Japanese Energy Policy after Fukushima Daiichi: Nuclear Ambivalence
John S. Duffield discusses the evolution of Japanese energy policy since the tragic events at Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011. He finds that deep divisions over nuclear power have stymied the development of a new political consensus on the role it should play in addressing the country’s energy needs and concerns about climate change.


 

Volume 131 - Number 1 - Spring 2016

The Senators’ Letter to Iran and Domestic Incorporation of International Law
Michael C. Dorf discusses a 2015 open letter from 47 Republican senators to the government of Iran warning that a nuclear agreement signed by President Barack Obama without congressional participation would lack lasting effect. He uses the letter to examine the relation between international and domestic law.


Volume 131 - Number 1 - Spring 2016

Between the Eagle and the Dragon: America, China, and Middle State Strategies in East Asia
G. John Ikenberry observes that East Asia is increasingly marked by the emergence of two hierarchies—a security hierarchy dominated by the United States and an economic hierarchy dominated by China. He argues that in this emerging regional order the United States will no longer exercise hegemony, rather it will be drawn into the region in new and more complex ways.


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Developments in Beijing

The Varieties of Collective Financial Statecraft: The BRICS and China
LESLIE ELLIOTT ARMIJO

Chinese Thinking on the South China Sea and the Future of Regional Security
FENG ZHANG

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Disruption, Demonization, Deliverance, and Norm Destruction: The Rhetorical Signature of Donald J. Trump

KATHLEEN HALL JAMIESON and DORON TAUSSIG examine Donald Trump’s rhetoric during the presidential campaign and through his first 100 days in office. They argue that Trump’s “rhetorical signature,” which distinguishes him from his predecessors, certified Trump’s authenticity as a candidate of change and now complicate his ability to govern.

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