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Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Critical Junctures, Catalysts, and Democratic Consolidation in Turkey
RAMAZAN KILINÇ argues that at critical junctures, structural factors weaken and actors are enabled to gain strength for future political trajectories. He applies this argument to democratic consolidation in Turkey. He finds that the 1997 military intervention unintentionally led to the eventual outcome of democratic consolidation. In the absence of this catalyst, it might have taken several more years for structural factors to generate democratization.


 

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

The Role of Political Science in China: Intellectuals and Authoritarian Resilience
STEPHEN NOAKES discusses the relationship between political scientists and the state in China. He argues that political scientists do more to strengthen the rule of the Chinese Communist Party than they do to undermine it, and are therefore complicit in preserving the authoritarian status quo.


 

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Finding Bin Laden: Lessons for a New American Way of Intelligence
ERIK J. DAHL describes the nearly decade-long search for Osama bin Laden and what it reveals about the capabilities and the limitations of the American intelligence community. He argues that this case suggests that we may be seeing the first signs of a “new American way of intelligence” with a reduced reliance on the expensive, high-technology systems of the Cold War and a greater emphasis on broad-based intelligence fusion and analysis.


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

After War: Inside the U.S. Civilian Struggle to Build Peace
RENANAH MILES examines recent stabilization and reconstruction missions in Afghanistan and Iraq. She analyzes persistent shortfalls in the ability of the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development to conduct these missions. She contends that organizational culture and bureaucratic turf wars undermine civilian leadership and encourage the military to compensate in its absence. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

What Really Happened in Planning for Postwar Iraq?
STEPHEN BENEDICT DYSON challenges the argument that the U.S. government failed to conduct planning for the post-Saddam Iraq. He shows that a plan for governing the country jointly with Iraqi leaders was developed and endorsed by the George W. Bush administration. Yet this plan was not implemented as a result of the on-the-ground decisions of Ambassador L. Paul Bremer, who formalized an occupation and began an extended period of direct rule. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

Globalization as a Security Strategy: Power and Vulnerability in the “China Model”
Andrew J. Nathan AND Andrew Scobell analyze the gains and losses to Chinese security from the country’s embrace of globalization in the post-Mao period. They argue that while China has grown richer and more influential, it has also been penetrated by global forces that it does not control and enmeshed in complex relationships of interdependence. 


Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

The Islamist Moment: From Islamic State to Civil Islam?
Fawaz A. Gerges discusses the rise to power of Islamist parties in the Middle East after the Arab Spring. He argues that the political future of Islamists will depend on whether they meet the rising expectations of the Arab public. He concludes that if the Islamists fail to deliver local public goods, the voters and society will turn against them. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 1 - Spring 2013

Responses to Labor Market Challenges: Greece, Ireland, and Portugal, 1990–2008
KATE NICHOLLS looks at policy responses to labor market challenges in Ireland, Portugal, and Greece between 1990 and 2008, focusing in particular on work-life balance, higher education, and immigration policies. She argues that there is greater divergence among the recent developmental paths taken by these three “bailout” countries than is often assumed. 


Volume 127 - Number 4 - Winter 2012-2013

The Paradox of Islam’s Future
RAYMOND W. BAKER argues that although violent extremism flows from radical Islamic movements, the Islamic mainstream has effectively adapted to the globalized world and will shape the future of Islam in ways open to principled accommodation with the West. He claims that mainstream assertiveness, unencumbered by Western interference, provides the most effective way to counter destructive radicalism. 


 

Volume 127 - Number 3 - Fall 2012

Sympathetic States: Explaining the Russian and Chinese Responses to September 11
Todd Hall examines the responses of the Russian Federation (RF) and People’s Republic of China (PRC) to the September 11 attacks on the United States. He argues that the sudden shift in RF and PRC policies toward the United States following the attacks poses a puzzle for existing IR theories. In order to comprehend RF and PRC behavior, he claims that we need to recognize the role of implicit norms of sympathy. 


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