Narrow by        Show free articles first  

U.S. Foreign Policy


Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Saint or Sinner? Human Rights and U.S. Support for the Arms Trade Treaty
JENNIFER L. ERICKSON analyses the U.S. decision to support the UN Arms Trade Treaty initiative in October 2009. She argues that this support was part of a broader policy shift toward multilateralism that the Obama administration made in an effort to repair the reputation of the United States within the diplomatic community.


Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Is the Pentagon Papers Case Relevant in the Age of WikiLeaks?
Bruce E. Altschuler revisits the Pentagon Papers case to determine its relevance in the internet age. He argues that the emergence of independent leakers with access to the internet has shifted greater responsibility on the mainstream media to practice self-restraint and to decide what to publish. The emergence of independent leakers has also accelerated prosecutions by the Obama administration.


Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Is the American Century Over?
Joseph S. Nye, Jr., discusses whether the “American century” beginning in 1941 has come to the end. He argues that transnational and non-state forces are changing America’s pre-eminence, but that we are not entering a post-American world.

Volume 130 - Number 2 - Summer 2015

Understanding International Partnership: The Complicated Rapprochement between the United States and Brazil
Javier Corrales studies the rapprochement between the United States and Brazil in an effort to develop a theory about international partnerships. He contends that power transitions can offer new incentives for cooperation so long as the existing power faces greater security threats in other regions of the world and the rising power meets certain tests of reliability.


Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Finding Bin Laden: Lessons for a New American Way of Intelligence
ERIK J. DAHL describes the nearly decade-long search for Osama bin Laden and what it reveals about the capabilities and the limitations of the American intelligence community. He argues that this case suggests that we may be seeing the first signs of a “new American way of intelligence” with a reduced reliance on the expensive, high-technology systems of the Cold War and a greater emphasis on broad-based intelligence fusion and analysis.


Volume 128 - Number 4 - Winter 2013-14

The India Lobby and the Nuclear Agreement with India
DINSHAW MISTRY discusses the campaign of Indian-American lobbying for a civilian nuclear agreement with India. He argues that Indian Americans were part of a broader “India lobby” which helped advance legislation on the civilian nuclear agreement through Congress. 

Volume 127 - Number 4 - Winter 2012-2013

The Paradox of Islam’s Future
RAYMOND W. BAKER argues that although violent extremism flows from radical Islamic movements, the Islamic mainstream has effectively adapted to the globalized world and will shape the future of Islam in ways open to principled accommodation with the West. He claims that mainstream assertiveness, unencumbered by Western interference, provides the most effective way to counter destructive radicalism. 

Volume 127 - Number 3 - Fall 2012

From Cold War to Hot Peace: The Habit of American Force
Richard K. Betts considers the discrepancy between ambition and cost tolerance that has led the United States to use force too often but also too indecisively since the Cold War. He argues that Washington should use American primacy not to attempt dominance on the cheap but to manage a transition to a global balance of power.

Volume 127 - Number 2 - Summer 2012

The China Card: Playing Politics with Sino-American Relations
Peter Trubowitz and Jungkun Seo examine how and when China emerged as a “hot button” issue in American politics. They show that the politicization of Sino-American relations has had as much to do with electoral strategizing and gamesmanship in the United States as it did with geopolitical considerations in dealing with Beijing.


Volume 127 - Number 1 - Spring 2012

Republican Elites and Foreign Policy Attitudes
Joshua W. Busby and Jonathan Monten analyze opinion polls, focusing on the degree of congruence between Republican elites and the general public on foreign policy. They find Republican elites to be consistently more internationalist than the public on most dimensions.

Page 1    OF 3 >

About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

From the Archives

European Union

A Democratic Dilemma: System Effectiveness versus Citizen Participation Robert A. Dahl argues that the Maastricht Treaty presented Europeans with a fundamental democratic dilemma: choosing between their political effectiveness as citizens within their countries and the effectiveness of the European Union as a transnational system.

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues


Candidate Selection Process

The Academy of Political Science and Political Science Quarterly present an online symposium focused on the candidate selection process. The scope of the articles included in the symposium is threefold: review the reasons why candidate recruiting is so critical to the success of political parties; evaluate how candidates assess personal and political choices and the way in which ambition endures over time; and, examine how the changing campaign finance landscape affects the resources available to those who consider running for political office.

Symposium Organizers: Paul S. Herrnson and Kelly D. Patterson


Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book


About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected
newsstand locator
About APS