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Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

Review: The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention
ERIC A. HEINZE


 

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

Review: Queer Clout: Chicago and the Rise of Gay Politics
Jason Pierceson


 

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

The Roberts Court and Democracy: A Review Essay on Judicial Review and Liberal Critique
ERIC SEGALL reviews Stephen Gottlieb’s recently published book Unfit for Democracy: The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics. He agrees with Gottlieb’s argument that the Roberts Court has too often neglected the needs of racial minorities, the poor, and the disenfranchised. Segall suggests that Gottlieb could have made a more persuasive case by setting forth in more detail the conservative positions supporting the Roberts Court decisions.


 

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

Military Aid and Human Rights: Assessing the Impact of U.S. Security Assistance Programs
MARIYA OMELICHEVA, BRITTNEE CARTER, and LUKE B. CAMPBELL assess the relationship between U.S. security assistance programs and the degree to which foreign militaries respect civilian human rights in times of political instability. They conclude that these programs do not have a uniform impact on human rights practices in the states that receive U.S. military aid. Rather, the relationship is contingent upon various factors, primarily whether security assistance programs include an educational and training component.


 

Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

The Causes and Effects of International Treaties
ROBERT L. BROWN analyses the relationship between state interests and the likelihood of international cooperation. He argues that while divergent interests create demand for treaty negotiations, converging interest are required for treaties to enter into force.


Volume 131 - Number 3 - Fall 2016

Decision Making in Using Assassinations in International Relations
Warner R. Schilling and JONATHAN L. SCHILLING analyze how leaders weigh the costs and benefits of using assassination to advance their foreign policy interests. They conclude that the decision-making process is prone to bias, especially when dependent on the identity of the likely successor.


 

Volume 130 - Number 4 - Winter 2015-16

Did Chirac Say ‘Non’? Revisiting UN Diplomacy on Iraq, 2002-03
Stefano Recchia revisits the George W. Bush administration’s attempt in the spring of 2003 to secure UN approval for the Iraq war. Drawing on new evidence from declassified documents and interviews with senior officials, he argues that the administration would have stood a good chance of securing UN approval—notwithstanding French opposition. But the administration had to be willing to postpone the start of military operations by up to six weeks and endorse a set of demanding benchmarks for Iraqi compliance, as proposed by Britain and several nonpermanent members of the Security Council. 


 

Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Saint or Sinner? Human Rights and U.S. Support for the Arms Trade Treaty
JENNIFER L. ERICKSON analyses the U.S. decision to support the UN Arms Trade Treaty initiative in October 2009. She argues that this support was part of a broader policy shift toward multilateralism that the Obama administration made in an effort to repair the reputation of the United States within the diplomatic community.


 

Volume 130 - Number 3 - Fall 2015

Is the Pentagon Papers Case Relevant in the Age of WikiLeaks?
Bruce E. Altschuler revisits the Pentagon Papers case to determine its relevance in the internet age. He argues that the emergence of independent leakers with access to the internet has shifted greater responsibility on the mainstream media to practice self-restraint and to decide what to publish. The emergence of independent leakers has also accelerated prosecutions by the Obama administration.


 

Volume 127 - Number 4 - Winter 2012-2013

Suspension of Law during Crisis
ROSS J. CORBETT analyzes the claim that the response to some emergencies requires a departure from the law. He notes that this claim rests on a particular view of what the law is and is best understood as an argument that emergencies ought to be handled extra-legally. He argues that interrogating this extra-legalist claim reveals another strategy for controlling executive discretion while permitting enough flexibility to preserve the public good. 


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