Volume 134 - Number 1 - Spring 2019

Voter ID Laws: The Disenfranchisement of Minority Voters?
BEN PRYOR, REBEKAH HERRICK and JAMES A. DAVIS examine the effects of strict voter identification laws on minority voter suppression. They analyze United States Census data and find that strict identification laws do not appear to disproportionally suppress voter turnout among minority groups.

pp. 63-83

Unstable Majorities: Polarization, Party Sorting, and Political Stalemate, Morris P. Fiorina
Reviewed by Matt Grossmann

pp. 147-148

Challenged Hegemony: The United States, China, and Russia in the Persian Gulf, Steven A. Yetiv
Reviewed by F. Gregory Gause III

pp. 152-154

Deep Roots: How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics, Avidit Acharya
Reviewed by Edward B. Rugemer

pp. 172-173

The Marines, Counterinsurgency, and Strategic Culture: Lessons Learned and Lost in America's Wars, Jeannie L. Johnson
Reviewed by Jason Dempsey

pp. 179-181

Volume 133 - Number 4 - Winter 2018-19

Why Trump Won’t Retrench: The Militarist Redoubt in American Foreign Policy
PETER HARRIS assesses the likelihood of a retrenchment in overseas commitments under President Donald J. Trump. He argues that the Trump administration may challenge aspects of the liberal international order, but is unlikely to retrench from America’s military commitments abroad.

pp. 611-640

American Grand Strategy and East Asian Security in the Twenty-First Century, David C. Kang
Reviewed by NICHOLAS D. ANDERSON

pp. 753-754

The Battle for the Court: Interest Groups, Judicial Elections, and Public Policy, Lawrence Baum
Reviewed by Michael J. Nelson

pp. 760-762

Latino Identity and Political Attitudes: Why Are Latinos Not Republican?, Angel Saavedra Cisneros
Reviewed by Heath Brown

pp. 766-767

Volume 133 - Number 3 - Fall 2018

The De-Institutionalization of Congress
ANTHONY J. CHERGOSKY and Jason M. Roberts argue that institutional changes in the United States Congress have eroded its capacity to enact laws and perform its essential duties. They maintain that the poor performance of Congress in recent years has resulted from these structural reforms which may not be permanent, but are difficult to reverse.

pp. 475-495

Hard Target: Sanctions, Inducements, and the Case of North Korea, Stephan Haggard
Reviewed by Bryan R. Early

pp. 561-562

Brexit: Why Britain Voted to Leave the European Union, Harold D. Clarke
Reviewed by Thomas S. Robinson

pp. 564-565

Black Republicans and the Transformation of the GOP ,Conservative but Not Republican: The Paradox of Party Identification and Ideology among African Americans, Joshua D. Farrington
Reviewed by Andra Gillespie

pp. 565-569

Ike and McCarthy: Dwight Eisenhower's Secret Campaign against Joseph McCarthy, David A. Nichols
Reviewed by Patrick Maney

pp. 598-599

Volume 133 - Number 2 - Summer 2018

The South China Sea and U.S.-China Rivalry
Andrew Scobell analyzes why the South China Sea has become a central matter in U.S.–China relations. He contends that geopolitics explains why this body of water has become such a contentious issue.

pp. 199-224

The Imprint of Congress, David R. Mayhew
Reviewed by Frances E. Lee

pp. 355-356

Nuclear Politics: The Strategic Causes of Proliferation, Alexandre Debs
Reviewed by Matthew Fuhrmann

pp. 358-359

Race and the Politics of Deception: The Making of an American City, Christopher Mele
Reviewed by Paru Shah

pp. 383-384

Voting Together: Intergenerational Politics and Civic Engagement among Hmong Americans, Carolyn Wong
Reviewed by Kau Vue

pp. 392-393

Volume 133 - Number 1 - Spring 2018

Understanding White Polarization in the 2016 Vote for President: The Sobering Role of Racism and Sexism

BRIAN  F.  SCHAFFNER,  MATTHEW  MACWILLIAMS,  and  Tatishe Nteta examine the extent to which economic insecurity, racism, and sexism were important factors in determining vote choices in the 2016 American presidential election. They find that racism and sexism were particularly strong predictors of vote choice in 2016, while economic insecurity was much less important.

pp. 9-34

Compromising Positions: Why Republican Partisans Are More Rigid than Democrats
James M. Glaser and Jeffrey M. Berry seek to explain why Republican legislators are less likely to favor compromise than Democrats. They argue that in their unwillingness to compromise, Republicans respond to the preferences of their constituents.

pp. 99-125

Return to Cold War, Robert Legvold
Reviewed by Jeffrey Mankoff

pp. 152-154

The White House Vice Presidency: The Path to Significance, Mondale to Biden, Joel K. Goldstein
Reviewed by Nancy Beck Young

pp. 154-155

Relic: How Our Constitution Undermines Effective Government—and Why We Need a More Powerful Presidency, William G. Howell
Reviewed by Matthew J. Dickinson

pp. 157-159

The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America's Most Vulnerable Citizens, Daniel L. Hatcher
Reviewed by SCOTT W. ALLARD

pp. 167-168
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