Regions

You have access
to this content
 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Political Groups, Coordination Costs, and Credible Communication in the Shadow of Power

BRANDON K. YODER, KURT TAYLOR GAUBATZ and Rachel A. Schutte argue that when political actors adopt public discourse that misrepresents their preferences, they risk hindering the effectiveness of private discussion required for them to meet their goals.


 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

A Prologue to Manifest Destiny: Why Britain Allowed the United States’ Unchallenged Rise in North America, 1836–1848

Dong Jung Kim analyzes why Britain did not respond militarily to the United States’ massive territorial expansion during the period of 1836–1848. Building on leading theories of great power politics, he argues that three considerations constrain a leading power’s military behavior against a rising power.


 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Hazy Accountability in a Federal System: The Role of Air Quality in Gubernatorial Performance Evaluation

Bradford H. Bishop and Jason A. Kalmbach discuss whether citizens hold state governors accountable for local air quality. They argue that their findings suggest that the public holds the president accountable for air quality, but not the governor.


 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Beyond Likely Voters: An Event Analysis of Conservative Political Outreach

Angie M. Bautista-Chavez and Sarah E. James look at the constituency-building strategies of three politically conservative organizations designed to reach veterans, millennials, and Latinos. They show how these organizations vary their outreach tactics to align the target audience with the political right.


Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

American Grand Strategy and the Rise of Offensive Realism

Ionut Popescu outlines the principles of a new American grand strategy grounded in an offensive realist theoretical framework. He argues that offensive realism is better suited to the new era of geopolitical competition with China and Russia.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Military Insubordination in Popular Mass Uprisings
Holger Albrecht explores the effects of popular mass uprisings on civil-military relations in authoritarian regimes. Drawing on cases from the Arab Spring, he examines different types of military insubordination and the conditions catalyzing military coups, mutinies, officer defections, and mass desertions.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Presidential Rhetoric and Bureaucratic Enforcement: The Clinton Administration and Civil Rights
CHARLES M. LAMB, JOSHUA BOSTON, and JACOB R. NEIHEISEL discuss President Bill Clinton’s civil rights record and examine his public rhetoric and bureaucratic appointments. They argue that their findings challenge popular perceptions of Clinton as a strong supporter of civil rights.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Explaining Why Some Muslims Support Islamist Political Violence
C. CHRISTINE FAIR and Parina Patel examine why some Muslims support Islamist political violence. They find, among other things, that those who were more exposed to Islamist violence as well as those living in countries with larger Muslim populations were more supportive of political violence.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Benjamin Netanyahu’s Calculated Ambiguity Toward the Two-State Solution
Guy Ziv analyzes the case of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s endorsement of the two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He argues that Netanyahu’s  June 2009  declaration was a  tactical maneuver rather than a reassessment of his beliefs.


Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Forecasting Models and the Presidential Vote
Kenneth A. Wink compares and contrasts a number of U.S. presidential election forecasting models and finds that some perform better than others. He argues that some systematic factors have an impact in every election regardless of the characteristics of the candidates, the effectiveness of the campaigns, and the events that occur in a particular election year.


Page 1    OF 9 >

About PSQ's Editor

Demetrios James Caraley

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

Editor’s spotlight

Primaries and Conventions for 2020

On To the Convention, Again
Caroline Monahan and Robert Y. Shapiro

Will the Outcome be “Democratic”?: Delegate Selection and the 2020 Primaries
Marianna Palumbo and Robert Y. Shapiro

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues

Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book

THE PROLIFERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS: Extending the U.S. Umbrella and Increasing Chances of War   THE PROLIFERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS: EXTENDING THE U.S. UMBRELLA AND INCREASING CHANCES OF WAR

CONFERENCES & EVENTS

Big Challenges for the 2020 U.S. Census
November 14, 2019
New York, NY

Members of the Academy of Political Science are invited to attend this timely panel discussion on the 2020 census.

MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT VIEW ALL EVENTS

About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected

newsstand locator
About APS