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Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Integration: A Key for Progress in Our Increasingly Diverse Country
Jaleel Howard and Pedro Noguera review the recently published Children on the Dram: Why School Integration Works and A Single Garment: Creating Intentionally Diverse Schools That Benefit All Children. They find that through in-depth analysis the books provide substantial evidence supporting the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision and the need for diverse schools. They argue that integration is not only a valuable tool in child development, but also essential for the future of American democracy.


 

Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Political Trust in Nonconsolidated Democracies: The Turkish Case in Comparative Perspective
Kursat Cinar and Tekin Kose explore individual- and country-level determinants of political trust in 17 nonconsolidated democracies with particular emphasis on the case of Turkey. They situate their findings in the growing body of literature on political trust, identifying similarities and differences, and offer insights on the correlates of political trust throughout the world.


 

Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Going Nuclear: The Promises and Perils of Nuclear Energy in China
Il Hyun Cho discusses China’s pursuit of nuclear energy and identifies domestic political legitimacy and geopolitical ambitions as key factors shaping Beijing’s policy. He argues that China’s nuclear drive raises questions about nuclear safety and proliferation.


 

Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

That “Special Something”: The U.S.-Australia Alliance, Special Relationships, and Emotions
Lloyd Cox and BRENDON O’CONNOR challenge the common realist assumption that emotions are irrelevant for understanding inter-state relations. They examine the notion of special relationships in international politics. They develop a distinctive approach to the collectivization of emotions within and between states and apply this to the U.S.-Australia
special relationship.


Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Limits of the Conservative Revolution in the States
MATT GROSSMANN analyzes the policy consequences of increasing Republican control of U.S. state governments since the 1990s. He finds that Republican states have enacted some new conservative policies, but many other liberal policy revolutions have continued unabated. He argues that conservative policymaking is difficult because federal policy and electoral incentives incentivize continued government expansion.


Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Foreign Policy Dilemmas and Opportunities for a New Administration: An Opinion Piece
Robert Jervis speculates about the likely foreign policy that a Democratic administration will follow if its candidate wins in November. He argues that President Donald Trump will have left a difficult legacy and his successor will have to simultaneously rebuild trust and instructions while also utilizing the leverage that Trump has generated.


 

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Neighborhood Defenders: Participatory Politics and America’s Housing Crisis
KATHERINE LEVINE EINSTEIN, DAVID M. GLICK, and Maxwell Palmer use a wide array of administrative, elite survey, and qualitative data to show how neighborhood participation in the housing permitting process exacerbates existing political inequalities, limits the housing supply, and contributes to the current affordable housing crisis.


 

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Do Campaign Events Matter? New Evidence from Voting Advice Applications
ANJA KILIBARDA, CLIFTON VAN DER LINDEN, and Yannick Dufresne leverage the extraordinarily large samples of public opinion collected by Voting Advice Application to examine the granular effects of campaign events on electoral outcomes. Drawing on the case of the 2011 Canadian federal election, they demonstrate how particular events that took place during the campaign contributed to the so-called ‘Orange Wave’ which catapulted the historically third party NDP into Official Opposition status.


 

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Political Science and Big Data: Structured Data, Unstructured Data, and How to Use Them
Jonathan Grossman and Ami Pedahzur examine how political scientists analyze and write about big data. They discuss the limitations of using structured big data for quantitative purposes, demonstrate the potential of unstructured big data for historically oriented political research, identify the main challenges of such research, and propose ways to overcome them.


 

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Intelligence in the Cyber Era: Evolution or Revolution?
DAVID V. GIOE, MICHAEL S. GOODMAN, and Tim Stevens consider whether the cyber era ushered in an intelligence revolution and identify areas of continuity and change in intelligence priorities and rationale in the Anglo-American intelligence communities. They argue that the cyber era is a technological revolution, but not an intelligence revolution.


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ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

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