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Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Hazy Accountability in a Federal System: The Role of Air Quality in Gubernatorial Performance Evaluation

Bradford H. Bishop and Jason A. Kalmbach discuss whether citizens hold state governors accountable for local air quality. They argue that their findings suggest that the public holds the president accountable for air quality, but not the governor.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Explaining Why Some Muslims Support Islamist Political Violence
C. CHRISTINE FAIR and Parina Patel examine why some Muslims support Islamist political violence. They find, among other things, that those who were more exposed to Islamist violence as well as those living in countries with larger Muslim populations were more supportive of political violence.


 

Volume 133 - Number 4 - Winter 2018-19

Is Health Care in England Really on the Road to Privatization?
Alex Waddan analyzes whether recent health policy reforms are leading to the privatization of health care in England. He concludes that important changes have taken place, but that the principle of social equity underpinning access to health care in England remains largely in place.


 

Volume 133 - Number 2 - Summer 2018

Review: Out of the Horrors of War: Disability Politics in World War II America
Aimee Medeiros


 

Volume 133 - Number 2 - Summer 2018

Not Waiting for Washington: Climate Policy Adoption in California and New York
ROGER KARAPIN explains the adoption of climate change policies by the California and New York state governments during the 2000s. He argues that despite structural barriers the convergence of problem and political events created policy windows that broad advocacy coalitions used to attain major policies.


 

Volume 133 - Number 2 - Summer 2018

Medicaid Politics in New York: Vested Interests and Policy-Focused Analysis
DANIEL DISALVO looks at the behavior and role of labor unions and hospitals in shaping New York’s Medicaid program. He finds that group pressures explain why New York’s Medicaid program is more expensive and more generous than those of other states.


 

Volume 133 - Number 1 - Spring 2018

Latino Democrats, Latino Republicans and Interest in Country of Origin Politics
Nikola Mirilovic and Philip H. Pollock III analyze 2012 American National Election Study data to examine why some Latino U.S. citizens, but not others, maintain an interest in their country of origin politics. They argue that party identification helps explain this variation and that Republicans are less likely than Democrats to maintain an interest.


 

Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

“Whither We Are Tending”: Interrogating the Retrenchment Narrative in U.S. Environmental Policy
DAVID J. SOUSA and Christopher McGrory Klyza argue that environmental policy moves in the direction favored by environmentalists due to the strong statutes that constitute the policy landscape. They find that this runs counter to the retrenchment narrative, which argues the opposite.


 

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?
DOV WAXMAN analyzes the role played by American Jews and American Jewish pro-Israel organizations in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. He challenges the popular notion that the pro-Israel lobby powerfully influences U.S. policy pertaining to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.


 

Volume 131 - Number 4 - Winter 2016–17

Conflict and Compromise in American Religious Politics: A Review Essay
DAVID O’CONNELL reviews two new books on religion’s role in American politics, Mark A. Smith’s Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics and Neil J. Young’s We Gather Together: The Religious Right and the Problem of Interfaith Politics. He argues that these works of scholarship show us how people of different religious and moral beliefs are not as politically divided as one might think.


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Demetrios James Caraley

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Presidential Power and Impeachment

American Political Institutions after Watergate--A Discussion
DEMETRIOS CARALEY, CHARLES V. HAMILTON, ALPHEUS T. MASON, ROBERT A. McCAUGHEY, NELSON W. POLSBY, JEFFREY L. PRESSMAN, ARTHUR M. SCHLESINGER, JR., GEORGE L. SHERRY, AND TOM WICKER

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