U.S. Politics & Public Policy

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Volume 133 - Number 1 - Spring 2018

Latino Democrats, Latino Republicans and Interest in Country of Origin Politics
Nikola Mirilovic and Philip H. Pollock III analyze 2012 American National Election Study data to examine why some Latino U.S. citizens, but not others, maintain an interest in their country of origin politics. They argue that party identification helps explain this variation and that Republicans are less likely than Democrats to maintain an interest.


Volume 133 - Number 1 - Spring 2018

Compromising Positions: Why Republican Partisans Are More Rigid than Democrats
James M. Glaser and Jeffrey M. Berry seek to explain why Republican legislators are less likely to favor compromise than Democrats. They argue that in their unwillingness to compromise, Republicans respond to the preferences of their constituents.


 

Volume 133 - Number 1 - Spring 2018

Understanding White Polarization in the 2016 Vote for President: The Sobering Role of Racism and Sexism

BRIAN  F.  SCHAFFNER,  MATTHEW  MACWILLIAMS,  and  Tatishe Nteta examine the extent to which economic insecurity, racism, and sexism were important factors in determining vote choices in the 2016 American presidential election. They find that racism and sexism were particularly strong predictors of vote choice in 2016, while economic insecurity was much less important.


 

Volume 132 - Number 4 - Winter 2017–18

Down with the Southern Cross: Opinions on the Confederate Battle Flag in South Carolina
SCOTT H. HUFFMON, H. GIBBS KNOTTS, and SETH C. MCKEE analyze the significant shift in public opinion among South Carolinians toward the Confederate battle flag, after the shooting in a Charleston, South Carolina, church in the summer of 2015. They argue that the shooting served as the catalyst that galvanized public opinion to support the removal of the flag flying on a Confederate memorial.


 

Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

The Racial Gap in Wait Times: Why Minority Precincts Are Underserved by Local Election Officials
STEPHEN PETTIGREW demonstrates that voters in mostly minority electoral precincts wait considerably longer than those in predominantly white precincts. He finds that a considerable amount of this racial gap can be attributed to logistical decisions made by local election officials.


 

Volume 132 - Number 3 - Fall 2017

Making America Grate Again: The “Italianization” of American Politics and the Future of Transatlantic Relations in the Era of Donald J. Trump
DAVID G. HAGLUND, MARCO CLEMENTI, and ANDREA LOCATELLI reflect on analogies drawn between President Donald Trump and two Italian counterparts: Benito Mussolini and Silvio Berlusconi. They conclude that while the former is widely off the mark, the latter provides some insight. They argue that a Berlusconi type Trump administration will prove challenging for transatlantic relations.


 

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

The Mediating Effect of Authoritarianism on Immigrant Access to TANF: A State-Level Analysis
JASON E. KEHRBERG discusses the effects of authoritarianism in American states and specifically on immigrant access to TANF. He uses an original measure of authoritarianism and concludes that states with authoritarian populations are more likely to deny immigrants access to welfare benefits.


 

Volume 132 - Number 2 - Summer 2017

Debating War Powers: Battles in the Clinton and Obama Administrations
SARAH BURNS challenges the concept that presidential overreach has eroded the separation of powers in the realm of warfare. She argues that rather than causing the erosion, presidents have responded to Congress’s reluctance to deliberate about military affairs. They have relied increasingly on questionable legal justifications from executive branch lawyers.


Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

When Do the Rich Win?
J. ALEXANDER BRANHAM, STUART N. SOROKA, and Christopher Wlezien examine the influence of economic “haves” and “have-nots” on public policy decisions in the United States. They find that the middle class, the rich, and the poor almost always agree on policies. When they disagree, the rich win only slightly more often. They conclude that the rich may matter more than they seemingly should but they do not dominate policymaking.


 

Volume 132 - Number 1 - Spring 2017

The Triumph of Polarized Partisanship in 2016: Donald Trump’s Improbable Victory
Gary C. Jacobson discusses the reasons Donald Trump’s victory was so improbable, considers why he won anyway, and speculates about what this portends for national politics going forward. He also analyzes the 2016 congressional elections. He finds them, by comparison, uneventful, but with results that confirm the thoroughly partisan, president-centered, and polarized nature of contemporary American electoral politics.


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