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U.S. Politics & Public Policy

 

Volume 129 - Number 2 - Summer 2014

Papers Please: State-Level Anti-Immigrant Legislation in the Wake of Arizona’s SB 1070
SOPHIA J. WALLACE examines the factors that influence the introduction of SB 1070–type bills in state legislatures. She finds that Republican control of state legislatures and a rising unemployment rate greatly increase the likelihood of introducing this type of restrictive immigration bill. She asserts that Latino population changes and the percentage of Latino state legislators do not have an impact.


 

Volume 128 - Number 4 - Winter 2013-14

Philosophical Pragmatism and the Constitutional Watershed of 1912
TRYGVE THRONTVEIT argues that intellectuals and activists indebted to the pragmatist tradition of American philosophy decisively shaped the debate between Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson during the election of 1912. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 3 - Fall 2013

Death and Taxes: Issue Framing and Conservative Coalition Maintenance
RICHARD MEAGHER describes how and why the estate tax became part of the pro-family agenda of social conservatives. He explores the role of estate tax repeal in maintaining the alliance between economic and social conservatives within the Republican Party. 


 

Volume 128 - Number 2 - Summer 2013

Cabinet Duration in Presidential Democracies
JAE HYEOK SHIN analyzes cabinet duration in ten presidential democracies in Latin America. He finds that cabinet attributes greatly affect cabinet durability and that the performance of the cabinet has larger effects on its stability than do its handling of exogenous crises. 


 

Volume 127 - Number 4 - Winter 2012-2013

Geographic Distribution of the Federal Stimulus of 2009
JAMES G. GIMPEL, FRANCES E. LEE, and REBECCA U. THORPE investigate why the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 did not always focus additional resources on areas where the recession’s downturn was most severe. They examine whether funds were allocated according to pork barrel politics or instead via “policy windows” through which advocates steered a diverse group of programs long desired for reasons unrelated to the recession. They find some support for both theories, but policy window effects were more important than pork barrel politics in accounting for distributional outcomes. 


 

Volume 127 - Number 3 - Fall 2012

Do Presidents Control Bureaucracy? The Federal Housing Administration during the Truman–Eisenhower Era
Charles M. Lamb and ADAM W. NYE show how the Federal Housing Administration continued to permit racial segregation in its mortgage insur­ance program for years after the Truman administration indicated that it must alter that policy. They argue that the case once again illustrates that presidential control has its limits as bureaucracy successfully defied presiden­tial preferences and continued on a policy trajectory opposed by the president. 


 

Volume 127 - Number 3 - Fall 2012

Making Migrant–Government Partnerships Work: Insights from the Logic of Collective Action
GUSTAVO A. FLORES-MACÍAS analyzes government efforts to attract col­lective remittances for development. Building on insights from the literature on collective action and illustrating with the cases of Mexico and El Salvador, he concludes that leadership incentives, positive inducements in the form of private good, and certain trust-enhancing rules play a key role in the success of government–migrant partnerships. 


 

Volume 127 - Number 2 - Summer 2012

Rethinking the Development of Legitimate Party Opposition in the United States, 1793–1828
Jeffrey S. Selinger reassesses the rhetoric of anti-partisanship of the early national period. The election of 1800 demonstrated that a mechanism had been invented for changing government, personnel, and policies without violence and destructiveness. The election rendered parties legitimate and was the functional equivalent of a revolution. This achievement, however, did not become widely accepted by Americans for at least another quarter of a century.
 


 

Volume 127 - Number 2 - Summer 2012

Skeletons in White House Closets: A Discussion of Modern Presidential Scandals
SCOTT BASINGER and Brandon Rottinghaus list and classify presidential scandals occurring since 1972. They examine the different types of scandals and analyze news coverage of these scandals and their durations. They conclude that a small, unrepresentative set of scandals accounts for most news coverage, generating the misperception of scandals as drawn-out affairs involving large numbers of officials.


 

Volume 127 - Number 1 - Spring 2012

Republican Elites and Foreign Policy Attitudes
Joshua W. Busby and Jonathan Monten analyze opinion polls, focusing on the degree of congruence between Republican elites and the general public on foreign policy. They find Republican elites to be consistently more internationalist than the public on most dimensions.


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