International Relations

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Volume - Number -

Pugnacious Presidents: Democratic Constitutional Systems and International Conflict
Matthew Kroenig and Madison Schramm analyze how domestic political institutions affect international conflict. Using standard international relations datasets on conflict, they demonstrate that jointly-presidential democratic dyads are over two times more likely to become involved in militarized interstate disputes than other jointly-democratic dyads. They also find that when it comes to lower-level conflicts, jointly-presidential dyads are statistically indistinguishable from nondemocratic dyads. They argue that the results have important implications for our understanding of democratic peace theory and the causes of international conflict.


Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

Policy or Pique? Trump and the Turn to Great Power Competition
Deborah Welch Larson analyzes Donald Trump’s policy toward China and Russia and the return of great power competition. She argues that Trump’s personalization of foreign policy undermined his trade war with China, and efforts to improve relations with Russia and that the Joe Biden administration will continue to compete but seek cooperation in areas of shared interests.


 

Volume 135 - Number 4 - Winter 2020-21

Conflict Aggravation or Alleviation? A Cross-National Examination of U.S. Military Aid’s Effect on Conflict Dynamics with Insights from Pakistan
Amira Jadoon analyzes the effects of U.S. military aid on conflict dynamics and violence within recipient states. She argues that higher levels of U.S. military aid to states with weak governance structures can inadvertently result in a diffusion rather than elimination of militant organizations and fail to constrain retaliatory attacks.


 

Volume 135 - Number 4 - Winter 2020-21

Perception and Misperception in U.S.-China Relations
Andrew Scobell assesses contemporary U.S.-China relations. He concludes that bilateral ties are best characterized as full-blown greatpower rivalry. He argues that heightened intensity and persistent hostility is likely due to the powerful impact of pervasive misperceptions and enduring negative images of each other.


 

Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Going Nuclear: The Promises and Perils of Nuclear Energy in China
Il Hyun Cho discusses China’s pursuit of nuclear energy and identifies domestic political legitimacy and geopolitical ambitions as key factors shaping Beijing’s policy. He argues that China’s nuclear drive raises questions about nuclear safety and proliferation.


 

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Intelligence in the Cyber Era: Evolution or Revolution?
DAVID V. GIOE, MICHAEL S. GOODMAN, and Tim Stevens consider whether the cyber era ushered in an intelligence revolution and identify areas of continuity and change in intelligence priorities and rationale in the Anglo-American intelligence communities. They argue that the cyber era is a technological revolution, but not an intelligence revolution.


 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

A Prologue to Manifest Destiny: Why Britain Allowed the United States’ Unchallenged Rise in North America, 1836–1848
Dong Jung Kim analyzes why Britain did not respond militarily to the United States’ massive territorial expansion during the period of 1836–1848. Building on leading theories of great power politics, he argues that three considerations constrain a leading power’s military behavior against a rising power.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Explaining Why Some Muslims Support Islamist Political Violence
C. CHRISTINE FAIR and Parina Patel examine why some Muslims support Islamist political violence. They find, among other things, that those who were more exposed to Islamist violence as well as those living in countries with larger Muslim populations were more supportive of political violence.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Benjamin Netanyahu’s Calculated Ambiguity Toward the Two-State Solution
Guy Ziv analyzes the case of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s endorsement of the two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He argues that Netanyahu’s  June 2009  declaration was a  tactical maneuver rather than a reassessment of his beliefs.


 

Volume 134 - Number 1 - Spring 2019

Budgets and Strategy: The Enduring Legacy of the Revolt of the Admirals
ANAND TOPRANI discusses the origins and significance of the 1949 “Revolt of the Admirals.” He argues that the unification of the U.S. military services and subsequent defense budget cuts made this rivalry among the military services intense. He concludes that inter-service rivalry was mitigated only by increases in defense spending and by civilian leaders allowing the services to determine how to allocate resources.


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