Share this
PREVIOUS ARTICLE ALL CONTENTS Next ARTICLE

Electoral Incentives in Congress, Jamie L. Carson and Joel Sievert

Reviewed by Jack D. Collens

BUY

 

Were nineteenth-century members of Congress subject to a similar electoral connection as their twentieth-century counterparts? Jamie L. Carson and Joel Sievert go beyond merely applying the three activities outlined in David Mayhew's Congress: The Electoral Connection (advertising, credit claiming, and position taking) to the 1800s in an effort to uncover the central components of the electoral connection. While many assume that Mayhew's argument primarily applies to a candidate-centered era, Carson and Sievert expand on a growing consensus that aspects of the electoral connection existed even in a party-centered era.

While other scholars have examined the electoral connection in the nineteenth century, Carson and Sievert argue that this work is too narrowly focused. To offer a more thorough analysis, Carson and Sievert (with Jeffery A. Jenkins) outline four crucial components of the electoral connection. First, members must be ambitious, in that they must desire a political career including the House. Second, members must have autonomy to control their own electoral destiny. Third, members must be able to be responsive to the needs of their constituencies. Finally, members must be accountable for their actions. Chapters 4–7 explore these components from 1820 through 1888, with specific emphasis on the

To continue reading, see options above.

About PSQ's Editor

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

Full Access

Join the Academy of Political Science and automatically receive Political Science Quarterly.

CONFERENCES & EVENTS

Book Talk | Phantoms of a Beleaguered Republic: The Deep State and the Unitary Executive
May 24, 2022
WEBINAR

MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT VIEW ALL EVENTS

Editor’s spotlight

Women's History Month

Woodrow Wilson, Alice Paul, and the Woman Suffrage Movement
Sally Hunter Graham

The Year of the Woman? Candidates, Voters, and the 1992 Elections
Ester R. Fuchs and Michael X. Delli Carpini

MORE ABOUT THIS TOPIC

Search the Archives

Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

view additional issues

Most read

Articles | Book reviews

Understanding the Bush Doctrine
Robert Jervis

The Study of Administration
Woodrow Wilson

Notes on Roosevelt's "Quarantine" Speech
Dorothy Borg

view all

New APS Book

Perspectives on Presidential Elections, 1992–2020   PERSPECTIVES ON PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS, 1992–2020

About US

Academy of Political Science

The Academy of Political Science, promotes objective, scholarly analyses of political, social, and economic issues. Through its conferences and publications APS provides analysis and insight into both domestic and foreign policy issues.

Political Science Quarterly

With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

Stay Connected

newsstand locator
About APS