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Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Integration: A Key for Progress in Our Increasingly Diverse Country
Jaleel Howard and Pedro Noguera review the recently published Children on the Dram: Why School Integration Works and A Single Garment: Creating Intentionally Diverse Schools That Benefit All Children. They find that through in-depth analysis the books provide substantial evidence supporting the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision and the need for diverse schools. They argue that integration is not only a valuable tool in child development, but also essential for the future of American democracy.


Volume 135 - Number 3 - Fall 2020

Limits of the Conservative Revolution in the States
MATT GROSSMANN analyzes the policy consequences of increasing Republican control of U.S. state governments since the 1990s. He finds that Republican states have enacted some new conservative policies, but many other liberal policy revolutions have continued unabated. He argues that conservative policymaking is difficult because federal policy and electoral incentives incentivize continued government expansion.


Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Foreign Policy Dilemmas and Opportunities for a New Administration: An Opinion Piece
Robert Jervis speculates about the likely foreign policy that a Democratic administration will follow if its candidate wins in November. He argues that President Donald Trump will have left a difficult legacy and his successor will have to simultaneously rebuild trust and instructions while also utilizing the leverage that Trump has generated.


 

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

The Southern Question: American Voluntary Association Development, 1876–1920
ADAM CHAMBERLAIN, ALIXANDRA B. YANUS, and Nicholas Pyeatt evaluate the efforts of voluntary associations to organize and expand in the South during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. They find that while organizing happened, there were serious impediments to the creation, expansion, and maintenance of associations. They argue that this had important consequences for the political representation of its citizens and the development of civil society in the region.


 

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

Obama, Congress, and Audience Costs: Shifting the Blame on the Red Line
SARAH BURNS and Andrew Stravers analyze President Barack Obama’s decisions regarding Libya in 2011 and Syria in 2013 and 2014. Using statistical and case study evidence they argue that Obama’s request for congressional support in 2013 was an excuse to avoid action and audience costs rather than a genuine effort to gain congressional support for military action.


 

Volume 134 - Number 4 - Winter 2019–20

The Symbolic Politics of Poverty in the United States: A Review Essay
Elizabeth Rigby reviews two recently published books on the politics of poverty in the United States: Lawrence J. McAndrews’s The Presidents and the Poor: America Battles Poverty 1964-2017 and Kristina C. Miler’s Poor Representation: Congress and the Politics of Poverty in the United States. Rigby argues that the books highlight that while policymakers continue calls for action on the issue of poverty, the actual policy response has been limited and the problem of poverty remains largely unsolved.


Volume 134 - Number 4 - Winter 2019–20

Striking a Blow for Unity? Race and Economics in the 2010 New Orleans Mayoral Election
MAREK STEEDMAN, ILIYAN ILIEV, Marcus Coleman, and Allan McBride analyze the 2010 New Orleans mayoral election. They find that racial, economic, and partisan context affected voting behavior. They argue that analytical approaches that account for the effects of social context on political behavior are important to understanding urban politics.


 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Hazy Accountability in a Federal System: The Role of Air Quality in Gubernatorial Performance Evaluation
Bradford H. Bishop and Jason A. Kalmbach discuss whether citizens hold state governors accountable for local air quality. They argue that their findings suggest that the public holds the president accountable for air quality, but not the governor.


 

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Beyond Likely Voters: An Event Analysis of Conservative Political Outreach
Angie M. Bautista-Chavez and Sarah E. James look at the constituency-building strategies of three politically conservative organizations designed to reach veterans, millennials, and Latinos. They show how these organizations vary their outreach tactics to align the target audience with the political right.


 

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Presidential Rhetoric and Bureaucratic Enforcement: The Clinton Administration and Civil Rights
CHARLES M. LAMB, JOSHUA BOSTON, and JACOB R. NEIHEISEL discuss President Bill Clinton’s civil rights record and examine his public rhetoric and bureaucratic appointments. They argue that their findings challenge popular perceptions of Clinton as a strong supporter of civil rights.


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ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

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