regions

Volume - Number -

After Trump: Enemies, Partisans, and Recovery
Christopher J. Fettweis discusses what political polarization in the United States has in common with the relationship between the Cold War superpowers. It argues that in both cases the “enemy image” warps perception of the other side and prevents meaningful reconciliation.  Applying insight from international relations to U.S. domestic politics, he discusses the pernicious effects of the enemy image and how to overcome it. 

Volume - Number -

The Geopolitical Consequences of COVID-19: Assessing Hawkish Mass Opinion in China
JOSHUA BYUN, D.G. KIM, and Sichen Li examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Chinese public’s foreign policy attitudes. Drawing on original surveys fielded in China during the first six months of the global pandemic, they find that ordinary Chinese citizens are conspicuously optimistic about China’s future position in the global balance of power, and that this optimism corresponds well with the widespread perception that the COVID-19 pandemic is accelerating China’s rise relative to the United States. 

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U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 136 - Number 2 - Summer 2021

Does Race Stop at the Water’s Edge? Elites, the Public, and Support for Foreign Intervention among White U.S. Citizens over Time
Jon Green examines recent and historical relationships between individuals’ racial attitudes and their support for U.S. foreign policy interventions abroad. He argues that such relationships are persistent over time and are strongest among college-educated citizens, who are likelier to be socialized into elite- level political conflict.

Volume 136 - Number 2 - Summer 2021

The Life Cycle of Grand Strategies: The Case of the American Shift to Containment
Ilai Z. Saltzman examines the way grand strategies change by identifying their “life-cycle.” He argues that replacing an existing grand strategy is a multiplayer and decentralized process incorporating the ideational inputs of various actors, and that this process is more chaotic, porous, and nonlinear than we tend to think.

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U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume - Number -

After Trump: Enemies, Partisans, and Recovery
Christopher J. Fettweis discusses what political polarization in the United States has in common with the relationship between the Cold War superpowers. It argues that in both cases the “enemy image” warps perception of the other side and prevents meaningful reconciliation.  Applying insight from international relations to U.S. domestic politics, he discusses the pernicious effects of the enemy image and how to overcome it. 

Volume 136 - Number 2 - Summer 2021

How to Win a “Long Game”: The Voting Rights Act, the Republican Party, and the Politics of Counter-Enforcement
Adrienne Jones and ANDREW POLSKY examine how the Republican Party engaged in counter-enforcement of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, notably during the Reagan and Bush 43 administrations, in an effort to maximize the voting strength of pro-Republican voting constituencies. They argue that sustained counter-enforcement efforts lead to sharp policy oscillations when parties alternate in power and that if a party pursues the long game of persistent counter-enforcement, it may find itself with the opportunity to achieve lasting results.

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International Relations

Volume - Number -

The Geopolitical Consequences of COVID-19: Assessing Hawkish Mass Opinion in China
JOSHUA BYUN, D.G. KIM, and Sichen Li examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Chinese public’s foreign policy attitudes. Drawing on original surveys fielded in China during the first six months of the global pandemic, they find that ordinary Chinese citizens are conspicuously optimistic about China’s future position in the global balance of power, and that this optimism corresponds well with the widespread perception that the COVID-19 pandemic is accelerating China’s rise relative to the United States. 

Volume - Number -

The Psychological Roots of Public Opinion toward a Militant Group: The Case of Pakistani Lashkar-e-Tayyaba
KARL KALTENTHALER and C. CHRISTINE FAIR explore the sources of public sympathy in Pakistan for Lashkar-e-Tayyaba. They argue that the most common and widely distributed factor influencing individual sympathy with a militant group is the expectation that the militant group will bestow a sense of personal significance on that individual. Using data from a 2014 survey of Pakistanis, they find that the quest for personal significance is the most important factor driving sympathy for the militant group. 

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Law & Institutions

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Neighborhood Defenders: Participatory Politics and America’s Housing Crisis
KATHERINE LEVINE EINSTEIN, DAVID M. GLICK, and Maxwell Palmer use a wide array of administrative, elite survey, and qualitative data to show how neighborhood participation in the housing permitting process exacerbates existing political inequalities, limits the housing supply, and contributes to the current affordable housing crisis.

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

Do Global Publics View Human Rights Organizations as Handmaidens of the United States?
David Crow and James Ron look at how global publics view the relationship between human rights organizations and the U.S. government. They argue that ordinary people across various world regions do not perceive human rights groups as “handmaidens” of U.S. foreign policy.

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Politics & Society

Volume 136 - Number 3 - Fall 2021

Gender and Support for Democracy in the United States and Canada
Mark Setzler and Alixandra B. Yanus examine gender gaps in support for democracy in the United States and Canada. They find that in both countries, women are modestly less supportive of democracy and key political liberties than men, but the factors that best predict support vary little by gender. They argue that women’s access to material benefits and satisfaction with political institutions have relatively little effect on support for democracy; these attitudes are best explained by civic capital and the belief that rights are protected by government.

Volume 136 - Number 3 - Fall 2021

On the Ordinary People’s Enemies: How Politicians in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands Communicate Populist Boundaries via Twitter and the Effects on Party Preferences
Michael Hameleers looks at how populist discourse is constructed in different regions that offer different opportunity structures for the “us versus them” frame to be effective. He concludes that established politicians are not likely to use populist ideas on Twitter and that populist ideas only make an impact on vote choice for relatively deprived citizens.

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About PSQ's Editor

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

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American Political Institutions after Watergate--A Discussion
DEMETRIOS CARALEY, CHARLES V. HAMILTON, ALPHEUS T. MASON, ROBERT A. McCAUGHEY, NELSON W. POLSBY, JEFFREY L. PRESSMAN, ARTHUR M. SCHLESINGER, JR., GEORGE L. SHERRY, AND TOM WICKER

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