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Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

What “The Cult of the Irrelevant” Neglects (And Gets Right): A Review Essay

PAUL MUSGRAVE reviews Michael Desch’s recently published The Cult of the Irrelevant: The Waning Influence of Social Science on National Security which argues that political science’s emphasis on methodology has made it irrelevant to policymakers. Musgrave disagrees and argues that political scientists’ sophistication has made them more useful to policymakers but that the obstacles to research influencing policy lie on the demand side.
 

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

Obama, Congress, and Audience Costs: Shifting the Blame on the Red Line

SARAH BURNS and Andrew Stravers analyze President Barack Obama’s decisions regarding Libya in 2011 and Syria in 2013 and 2014. Using statistical and case study evidence they argue that Obama’s request for congressional support in 2013 was an excuse to avoid action and audience costs rather than a genuine effort to gain congressional support for military action.
 

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U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

What “The Cult of the Irrelevant” Neglects (And Gets Right): A Review Essay

PAUL MUSGRAVE reviews Michael Desch’s recently published The Cult of the Irrelevant: The Waning Influence of Social Science on National Security which argues that political science’s emphasis on methodology has made it irrelevant to policymakers. Musgrave disagrees and argues that political scientists’ sophistication has made them more useful to policymakers but that the obstacles to research influencing policy lie on the demand side.
 

Volume 134 - Number 4 - Winter 2019–20

How Foreign Policy Shapes American National Identity

PAUL T. McCARTNEY discusses how foreign policy has shaped American national identity. He argues that American national identity has changed since the nation’s founding and that foreign policy contributed to this evolution.

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U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

The Southern Question: American Voluntary Association Development, 1876–1920

ADAM CHAMBERLAIN, ALIXANDRA B. YANUS, and Nicholas Pyeatt evaluate the efforts of voluntary associations to organize and expand in the South during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. They find that while organizing happened, there were serious impediments to the creation, expansion, and maintenance of associations. They argue that this had important consequences for the political representation of its citizens and the development of civil society in the region.
 

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

Obama, Congress, and Audience Costs: Shifting the Blame on the Red Line

SARAH BURNS and Andrew Stravers analyze President Barack Obama’s decisions regarding Libya in 2011 and Syria in 2013 and 2014. Using statistical and case study evidence they argue that Obama’s request for congressional support in 2013 was an excuse to avoid action and audience costs rather than a genuine effort to gain congressional support for military action.
 

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International Relations

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

A Prologue to Manifest Destiny: Why Britain Allowed the United States’ Unchallenged Rise in North America, 1836–1848

Dong Jung Kim analyzes why Britain did not respond militarily to the United States’ massive territorial expansion during the period of 1836–1848. Building on leading theories of great power politics, he argues that three considerations constrain a leading power’s military behavior against a rising power.

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Explaining Why Some Muslims Support Islamist Political Violence
C. CHRISTINE FAIR and Parina Patel examine why some Muslims support Islamist political violence. They find, among other things, that those who were more exposed to Islamist violence as well as those living in countries with larger Muslim populations were more supportive of political violence.

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Law & Institutions

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

Do Global Publics View Human Rights Organizations as Handmaidens of the United States?

David Crow and James Ron look at how global publics view the relationship between human rights organizations and the U.S. government. They argue that ordinary people across various world regions do not perceive human rights groups as “handmaidens” of U.S. foreign policy.
 

Volume 134 - Number 1 - Spring 2019

Constitutional Foundations of Military Coups
ABDULLAH AYDOGAN argues that military coups are less likely to occur in countries with parliamentary systems. In these countries, he claims, military elites seeking to remove chief executives often select other strategies, such as threatening legislators.

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Politics & Society

Volume 134 - Number 3 - Fall 2019

Hazy Accountability in a Federal System: The Role of Air Quality in Gubernatorial Performance Evaluation

Bradford H. Bishop and Jason A. Kalmbach discuss whether citizens hold state governors accountable for local air quality. They argue that their findings suggest that the public holds the president accountable for air quality, but not the governor.

Volume 134 - Number 2 - Summer 2019

Explaining Why Some Muslims Support Islamist Political Violence
C. CHRISTINE FAIR and Parina Patel examine why some Muslims support Islamist political violence. They find, among other things, that those who were more exposed to Islamist violence as well as those living in countries with larger Muslim populations were more supportive of political violence.

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About PSQ's Editor

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

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Women and Politics

Woodrow Wilson and Woman Suffrage: A New Look
Christine A. Lunardini and Thomas J. Knock

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William F. Ogburn and Inez Goltra

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Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

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With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

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