regions

Volume - Number -

Economic Sectionalism, Executive-Centered Partisanship, and the Politics of the State and Local Tax Deduction
Nicholas F. Jacobs examines the partisan implications of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and its reform of the state and local tax deduction. He concludes that fundamental changes in the geographic composition of the electorate and the centrality of presidential politics in the party system explains why the Republican Party reduced one of the most unequal features of the U.S. tax code, but chose not to emphasize its egalitarian consequences. 

Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

How the 1976 Election Reshaped American Politics: A Review Essay
Kathryn Cramer Brownell reviews two recently published books on Jimmy Carter: The Election of the Evangelical: Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and the Presidential Contest of 1976 and Jimmy Carter and the Birth of the Marathon Media Campaign. She argues that the discussion of the 1976 election put forth in these two books contributes to our understanding of modern political realignment and polarization.

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U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

Policy or Pique? Trump and the Turn to Great Power Competition
Deborah Welch Larson analyzes Donald Trump’s policy toward China and Russia and the return of great power competition. She argues that Trump’s personalization of foreign policy undermined his trade war with China, and efforts to improve relations with Russia and that the Joe Biden administration will continue to compete but seek cooperation in areas of shared interests.

Volume 135 - Number 4 - Winter 2020-21

Conflict Aggravation or Alleviation? A Cross-National Examination of U.S. Military Aid’s Effect on Conflict Dynamics with Insights from Pakistan
Amira Jadoon analyzes the effects of U.S. military aid on conflict dynamics and violence within recipient states. She argues that higher levels of U.S. military aid to states with weak governance structures can inadvertently result in a diffusion rather than elimination of militant organizations and fail to constrain retaliatory attacks.

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U.S. POLITICS & PUBLIC POLICY

Volume - Number -

Economic Sectionalism, Executive-Centered Partisanship, and the Politics of the State and Local Tax Deduction
Nicholas F. Jacobs examines the partisan implications of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and its reform of the state and local tax deduction. He concludes that fundamental changes in the geographic composition of the electorate and the centrality of presidential politics in the party system explains why the Republican Party reduced one of the most unequal features of the U.S. tax code, but chose not to emphasize its egalitarian consequences. 

Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

The Presidential and Congressional Elections of 2020: A National Referendum on the Trump Presidency
Gary C. Jacobson discusses the 2020 presidential and congressional elections. He argues that the elections were above all a referendum on Donald Trump’s presidency, which provoked extreme levels of party loyalty, partisan polarization, and partisan animosity in the electorate, as well as the highest voter turnout in more than a century.

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International Relations

Volume - Number -

Pugnacious Presidents: Democratic Constitutional Systems and International Conflict
Matthew Kroenig and Madison Schramm analyze how domestic political institutions affect international conflict. Using standard international relations datasets on conflict, they demonstrate that jointly-presidential democratic dyads are over two times more likely to become involved in militarized interstate disputes than other jointly-democratic dyads. They also find that when it comes to lower-level conflicts, jointly-presidential dyads are statistically indistinguishable from nondemocratic dyads. They argue that the results have important implications for our understanding of democratic peace theory and the causes of international conflict.

Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

Policy or Pique? Trump and the Turn to Great Power Competition
Deborah Welch Larson analyzes Donald Trump’s policy toward China and Russia and the return of great power competition. She argues that Trump’s personalization of foreign policy undermined his trade war with China, and efforts to improve relations with Russia and that the Joe Biden administration will continue to compete but seek cooperation in areas of shared interests.

more articles

Law & Institutions

Volume 135 - Number 2 - Summer 2020

Neighborhood Defenders: Participatory Politics and America’s Housing Crisis
KATHERINE LEVINE EINSTEIN, DAVID M. GLICK, and Maxwell Palmer use a wide array of administrative, elite survey, and qualitative data to show how neighborhood participation in the housing permitting process exacerbates existing political inequalities, limits the housing supply, and contributes to the current affordable housing crisis.

Volume 135 - Number 1 - Spring 2020

Do Global Publics View Human Rights Organizations as Handmaidens of the United States?
David Crow and James Ron look at how global publics view the relationship between human rights organizations and the U.S. government. They argue that ordinary people across various world regions do not perceive human rights groups as “handmaidens” of U.S. foreign policy.

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Politics & Society

Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

How the 1976 Election Reshaped American Politics: A Review Essay
Kathryn Cramer Brownell reviews two recently published books on Jimmy Carter: The Election of the Evangelical: Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and the Presidential Contest of 1976 and Jimmy Carter and the Birth of the Marathon Media Campaign. She argues that the discussion of the 1976 election put forth in these two books contributes to our understanding of modern political realignment and polarization.

Volume 136 - Number 1 - Spring 2021

America’s Crisis of Democracy
William G. Howell and TERRY M. MOE explain how the populist threat to American democracy has been fueled by our government’s ineffective responses to the disruptive economic and cultural problems of modernity. They argue that saving democracy calls for aggressive policy actions and institutional reforms that balance the promise and the fear of presidential power.

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About PSQ's Editor

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO

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April 27, 2021

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Editor’s spotlight

On Democracy: Remembering Demetrios James Caraley

Complications of American Democracy: Elections Are Not Enough
Demetrios James Caraley

Shoring up the Right to Vote for President: A Modest Proposal [with Panel Discussion]
ALEXANDER KEYSSAR

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Publishing since 1886, PSQ is the most widely read and accessible scholarly journal with distinguished contributors such as: Lisa Anderson, Robert A. Dahl, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert Jervis, Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Theda Skocpol, Woodrow Wilson

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Presidential Selection and Democracy   PRESIDENTIAL SELECTION AND DEMOCRACY

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With neither an ideological nor a partisan bias, PSQ looks at facts and analyzes data objectively to help readers understand what is really going on in national and world affairs.

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